Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a situation where 2 different processes(mine C++, other done by other people in JAVA) are a writer and a reader from some shared data file. So I was trying to avoid race condition by writing a class like this(EDIT:this code is broken, it was just an example)

class ReadStatus
{
    bool canRead;
public:
    ReadStatus()
    {
        if (filesystem::exists(noReadFileName))
        {
            canRead = false;
            return;
        }
        ofstream noWriteFile;
        noWriteFile.open (noWriteFileName.c_str());
        if ( ! noWriteFile.is_open())
        {
            canRead = false;
            return;
        }
        boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::seconds(1));
        if (filesystem::exists(noReadFileName))
        {
            filesystem::remove(noWriteFileName);
            canRead= false;
            return;
        }
        canRead= true;
    }
    ~ReadStatus()
    {
        if (filesystem::exists(noWriteFileName))
            filesystem::remove(noWriteFileName);
    }
    inline bool OKToRead()
    {
        return canRead;
    }
};

usage:

ReadStatus readStatus; //RAII FTW
    if ( ! readStatus.OKToRead())
        return;

This is for one program ofc, other will have analogous class. Idea is: 1. check if other program created his "I'm owner file", if it has break else go to 2. 2. create my "I'm the owner" file, check again if other program created his own, if it has delete my file and break else go to 3. 3. do my reading, then delete mine "I'm the owner file".

Please note that rare occurences when they both dont read or write are OK, but the problem is that I still see a small chance of race conditions because theoretically other program can check for the existence of my lock file, see that there isnt one, then I create mine, other program creates his own, but before FS creates his file I check again, and it isnt there, then disaster occurs. This is why I added the one sec delay, but as a CS nerd I find it unnerving to have code like that running. Ofc I don't expect anybody here to write me a solution, but I would be happy if someone does know a link to a reliable code that I can use. P.S. It has to be files, cuz I'm not writing entire project and that is how it is arranged to be done.

P.P.S.: access to data file isn't reader,writer,reader,writer.... it can be reader,reader,writer,writer,writer,reader,writer....

P.P.S: other process is not written in C++ :(, so boost is out of the question.

share|improve this question
1  
+1 for using RAII. :) –  Xeo Jun 3 '11 at 15:12
1  
Why reinvent the wheel instead of wrapping the locking primitives provided by your OS? –  NPE Jun 3 '11 at 15:21
    
@aix -like I said I'm not writing the entire project, and I'm not designing it. Ofc IF nobody answers with the some "FS mutex" magic, I'll cry and then ask for the change in the design, or hope that timeout gives a good enough probability of avoiding race cond. –  NoSenseEtAl Jun 3 '11 at 15:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

On Unices the traditional way of doing pure filesystem based locking is to use dedicated lockfiles with mkdir() and rmdir(), which can be created and removed atomically via single system calls. You avoid races by never explicitly testing for the existence of the lock --- instead you always try to take the lock. So:

lock:
    while mkdir(lockfile) fails
        sleep

unlock:
    rmdir(lockfile)

I believe this even works over NFS (which usually sucks for this sort of thing).

However, you probably also want to look into proper file locking, which is loads better; I use F_SETLK/F_UNLCK fcntl locks for this on Linux (note that these are different from flock locks, despite the name of the structure). This allows you to properly block until the lock is released. These locks also get automatically released if the app dies, which is usually a good thing. Plus, these will let you lock your shared file directly without having to have a separate lockfile. This, too, work on NFS.

Windows has very similar file locking functions, and it also has easy to use global named semaphores that are very convenient for synchronisation between processes.

share|improve this answer
1  
Heh, nice idea to not even test if the file is there. –  Xeo Jun 3 '11 at 15:58
    
Cool idea, with mkdir. Do you know if boost::filesystem::create_directory() is also atomic? If not on all platforms then maybe just on Linux. –  NoSenseEtAl Jun 6 '11 at 4:46
1  
I've got absolutely no idea what boost is doing inside create_directory(), but I can't imagine a sane operating system where the underlying make-directory system call wasn't atomic. –  David Given Jun 6 '11 at 10:31
    
Is there any windows alternative to F_SETLK/F_UNLCK fcntl locks that work over NFS and also destroy the lock(s) upon program termination? –  Sir Digby Chicken Caesar Sep 16 at 20:01

As far as I've seen it, you can't reliably use files as locks for multiple processes. The problem is, while you create the file in one thread, you might get an interrupt and the OS switches to another process because I/O is taking so long. The same holds true for deletion of the lock file.

If you can, take a look at Boost.Interprocess, under the synchronization mechanisms part.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry, but the other process isn't written in c++, JAVA :(. Ill update original question –  NoSenseEtAl Jun 3 '11 at 15:26
    
This is incorrect (for Windows anyway). You can reliably use files as locks, you just have to know what you are doing. Read up on Opportunistic Locks. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… –  Phillip Scott Givens Oct 7 '13 at 16:08

While I'm generally against making API calls which can throw from a constructor/destructor (see docs on boost::filesystem::remove) or making throwing calls without a catch block in general that's not really what you were asking about.

You could check out the Overlapped IO library if this is for windows. Otherwise have you considered using shared memory between the processes instead?

Edit: Just saw the other process was Java. You may still be able to create a named mutex that can be shared between processes and used that to create locks around the file IO bits so they have to take turns writing. Sorry I don't know Java so no I idea if that's more feasible than shared memory.

share|improve this answer
    
Tnx for the remove info, but for the other boost:my fault for not specifying that I cant use boost because it is for interprocess communication with JAVA process. I have updaten original question now. Also it is for Linux, but ofc I would prefer the platform agnostic solution. –  NoSenseEtAl Jun 3 '11 at 15:35
    
(Offtopic )Also about the lack of the catch block: do you see any point of having it. I mean if remove failed and it is a locking mechanism I don't see any reasonable way to recover from that. Should I just while loop like a maniac until I don't get a exception or is there a nicer way to deal with it? –  NoSenseEtAl Jun 3 '11 at 15:39
1  
Ideally at a minimum you'd log the error or inform the user, if you want to have a remove request queue or something fancier and push another attempt to remove when one fails that's up to you but there's usually a viable reason removed failed (like some other process writing to it) –  AJG85 Jun 3 '11 at 15:44
1  
Also read this to learn about when and when not to throw and how to handle exceptions (constructor and destructors are covered): parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/exceptions.html –  AJG85 Jun 3 '11 at 15:46
1  
I like the casual presentation of information. There is an even better article by Herb Sutter but I couldn't find a link. The gist is don't throw from a destructor but do throw from a constructor if you need to signal failure to create, and be sure to handle it. –  AJG85 Jun 3 '11 at 16:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.