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I'd like my code to print:

B B
A B
B A

But it prints

Item Item
Item Item
Item Item

The code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct Item {
    Item(){}
    virtual void method1 (Item x, Item y) {cout << "Item Item\n";}
};

struct A : public Item {
    A(){}
};

struct B : public Item {
    B(){}
    virtual void method1 (B x, B y) {cout << "B B\n";}
    virtual void method1 (A x, B y) {cout << "A B\n";}
    virtual void method1 (B x, A y) {cout << "B A\n";}
};

int main ( void ) {
    Item * a[2];
    a[0] = new B; a[1] = new A;
    a[0]->method1(*a[0], *a[0]);
    a[0]->method1(*a[1], *a[0]);
    a[0]->method1(*a[0], *a[1]);
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your overloads of method1 in B don't override the virtual method in Item. So, when you call someItem->method1, it is not going to use them.

It looks like you want what is called "multiple dispatch", which C++ doesn't support directly. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple_dispatch#C.2B.2B for some discussion and workarounds.

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Thanks for your help –  Nikolas Jíša Jun 3 '11 at 15:31

You are not overidding the method1 with appropriate parameters so it keeps calling method1 in Item class.

Item * a[2];

So *a[0] & *a[1] both are of the type Item. This causes your calls of:

a[0]->method1(*a[0], *a[0]);
a[0]->method1(*a[1], *a[0]);
a[0]->method1(*a[0], *a[1]);

as calls to method1(Type,Type) which is defined in the Base Item class.
You should override this method with same parameters in your child classes to be able to call methods in child class.

Here is what I think you are trying to do:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct Item {
    Item(){}
    virtual void method1 (Item x, Item y) {cout << "Item Item\n";}
    virtual void method2 (Item x, Item y) {cout << "Item Item\n";}
    virtual void method3 (Item x, Item y) {cout << "Item Item\n";}
};

struct A : public Item {
    A(){}
};

struct B : public Item {
    B(){}
    virtual void method1 (Item x, Item y) {cout << "B B\n";}
    virtual void method2 (Item x, Item y) {cout << "A B\n";}
    virtual void method3 (Item x, Item y) {cout << "B A\n";}

};

int main ( void ) 
{
    Item * a[2];
    a[0] = new B; a[1] = new A;
    a[0]->method1(*a[0], *a[0]);
    a[0]->method2(*a[1], *a[0]);
    a[0]->method3(*a[0], *a[1]);
}

This will give you the desired output of:

output:
B B
A B
B A

Here method1(),method2()&method3()` are appropriately overridden in the Child class and hence they get called when called through a pointer actually pointing to a child class object.

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Thanks for your help –  Nikolas Jíša Jun 3 '11 at 15:37

The type of a is an array of pointers to Item. The compiler must decide which method to call at compile time, not run time. Since all it knows is the types of the arguments, which is Item, that's the version that it calls.

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Aha, thanks for your help –  Nikolas Jíša Jun 3 '11 at 15:35

You've changed the signature of the function in the derived class. It's an entirely new virtual function now. You should not change the paramter type when you're deriving. It's only allowed to change the return type of a virtual function, that even should a derivation of the base class. Basically you're not really using runtime polymorphism in this case.

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They both support polymorphism - struct and class in C++ differ in default access modifiers (public vs. private). –  birryree Jun 3 '11 at 15:21
    
I updated it. I mistook the question first –  sarat Jun 3 '11 at 15:25
    
Thanks for your help –  Nikolas Jíša Jun 3 '11 at 15:32

The function that's called is based on the static type of the arguments, not the dynamic type. So, they're all Item. You're looking for a language feature called multimethod, which is not in C++ but can be emulated with some work.

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Thanks for your help –  Nikolas Jíša Jun 3 '11 at 15:33

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