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I have a WPF application built with MVVM and am trying to display a custom class in a combobox. I am still getting the Namespace.Asset despite overriding the ToString Method to something easier on the eyes. What am I doing wrong? XAML code

<ComboBox ItemsSource="{Binding Drivers}" SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedDriver}" Grid.Row="20" Grid.Column="1" Grid.ColumnSpan="3"/>

ViewModel Code

    public List<Driver> Drivers
    {
        get
        {
            return this.drivers;
        }
        set
        {
            this.drivers = value;
            this.RaisePropertyChanged("Drivers");
        }
    }

    public Driver SelectedDriver
    {
        get
        {
            return this.selectedDriver;
        }
        set
        {
            this.selectedDriver = value;
            this.RaisePropertyChanged("SelectedDriver");
        }
    }

One of the custom classes code with overriden ToString

public class ExperimentalDriver : Driver
{
    public override DriverResponse GetDriverResponse(double time)
    {
         ... random unrelated code....
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return "Experimental Driver";
    }
}
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Your reference is bad. Remove the reference to the assembly with the ExperimentalDriver class and re-add it as a project reference. –  Will Jun 3 '11 at 15:32
    
It was a project reference, but I deleted it and re-added it for giggles and it is still showing up as a Namespace.Asset instead of "Experimental Driver" –  PlTaylor Jun 3 '11 at 15:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You might need to set the ToString() on the base class

Something like:

public class Driver
{
    protected string displayName;

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return displayName;
    }
}

Then your class constructors for your sub classes would simply set the displayName

public class ExperimentalDriver : Driver
{
    public ExperimentalDriver()
    {
        displayName = "Experimental Driver";
    }
}
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This works exactly as advertised, and it's slightly more elegant than my original solution. I just discovered before you posted that what was causing the problem was the fact that I had public new abstract string ToString(); in my base class. When I commented that out the problem disappeared as well. –  PlTaylor Jun 3 '11 at 16:00

Ok I figured it out. I have an abstract class "Driver" in that abstract class I added the following code to require all my derived classes to have a ToString() method

public new abstract string ToString();

When I remove it the problem goes away.

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