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If there is a class A and I instantiate three objects x,y,z of A, and there is a function foo() in A, then will three copies of machine code exist for f (one for each object)?

What is the purpose of class methods? When all objects have shared code why use class methods anyway? Is it just an abstraction to an HLL programmer?

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No, there won't. There will be only one copy of the code. Each class instance will however have its own copies of the class's member variables.

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Note: Although this is in principle language-dependent, even interpreting implementations of dynamic languages reuse the same bytecode chunk for the same function and the same function for multiple instances. For example, Python stores methods in class objects and instances don't even have references to their methods, only one to the class. –  delnan Jun 3 '11 at 15:56
    
Thanks. I understand that objects will have separate data storage. One more thing though. What is the purpose of class methods? When all objects have shared code why use class methods anyway? Is it just an abstraction to an HLL programmer? –  farhanhubble Jun 3 '11 at 16:00
    
@farhan We need per class methods to support two of the key features of OO - encapsulation and polymorphism. –  nbt Jun 3 '11 at 16:06
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You also asked about Class Methods which are also known as Static methods.

In this case there is still only one copy of the code but when executed it can only modify static members, which all instances of the class (the objects) will see.

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