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In a dll (GUI) I need to get a List of all namespaces in the current Application (so for example if I would bind that dll into a Project named "Hundekuchen", it should List

{ "GUI", "Hundekuchen" }

Is there any inbuilt function for this?

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Please don't forget to accept an answer if it was useful for you! Thanks. –  NickAldwin Jun 3 '11 at 18:50
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Look into the System.Reflection namespace, this is where you will find the functionality to retrieve information about assemblies.

This may not be exactly whay you need but it shows the sort of things you can achieve, I am getting all the types in the currently executing assembly, iterates them and prints out the namespace of each type.

foreach (Type t in Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetTypes())
{
    Console.WriteLine(t.Namespace);
}

Just inspect the Assembly class and you should find a way to solve your problem.

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I looked into this class first, I didnt found a solution –  Blaxx Jun 3 '11 at 16:03
    
what exactly do you want to do? do you want to dynamically load a dll and then print out the namespaces contained within it? –  jcvandan Jun 3 '11 at 16:05
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No built-in function, but you can enumerate the types in the assembly, and get their namespaces.

        Assembly asm = typeof(MyApplication).Assembly;
        List<string> namespaces = new List<string>();
        foreach (var type in asm.GetTypes())
        {
            string ns = type.Namespace;
            if (!namespaces.Contains(ns))
            {
                namespaces.Add(ns);
            }
        }

        foreach (var ns in namespaces)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ns);
        }
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3  
asm.GetTypes().Select(type => type.NameSpace).Distinct() is more concise and will perform better because List.Contains() is O(n), and Distinct should be using hashset for that (so effectively it's O(1)). –  Dyppl Jun 3 '11 at 16:25
    
Awesome, I should use Linq more often. Thanks for the tip! –  carlosfigueira Jun 3 '11 at 16:33
    
@carlosfigueira: it's not sarcasm, is it? I respect your expertise and have no doubt that you know that as well, my comment was meant to serve as an addition to your answer for OP. –  Dyppl Jun 3 '11 at 16:46
1  
Note that you can use hash logic without using linq, by using HashSet<> instead of List<>. Too many programmers overlook this possibility. –  phoog Jun 3 '11 at 16:51
    
@Dyppl, no, it wasn't sarcasm. I really don't use Linq as often as I should (old habits die hard). But every time I see some small, concise Linq expressions it reminds myself that I should try to break from the past and move into the new world :) –  carlosfigueira Jun 3 '11 at 17:19
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You can get a list of all assemblies in the AppDomain, then all classes in all loaded assemblies, but you will have to filter out the ones you don't want to see because there are lots of assemblies linked in from mscorlib and the System libraries. Here's a quick and dirty one (using .NET 3.5) - you might need to filter out a few more if you link other libraries you don't want to see:

    var enumerable = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()
        .SelectMany(assembly => assembly.GetTypes())
        .Select(type => type.Namespace)
        .Distinct()
        .Where(name => name != null &&
                       !name.StartsWith("System") &&
                       !name.StartsWith("Microsoft") &&
                       !name.StartsWith("MS.") &&
                       !name.StartsWith("<"));
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It might not have been the answer the OP was looking for, but this solved my particular problem. Thanks a bunch! –  lettucemode Jun 13 '12 at 20:29
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