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#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
   int i = 10;
   printf("%d\n", ++(-i)); // <-- Error Here
}

What is wrong with ++(-i)? Please clarify.

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3  
What would that even mean? –  SLaks Jun 3 '11 at 17:05
1  
Even if it would do something reasonable I would still beg you to rewrite it in a way that makes sense to people who will read your code later –  Dyppl Jun 3 '11 at 17:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

-i generates a temporary and you can't apply ++ on a temporary(generated as a result of an rvalue expression). Pre increment ++ requires its operand to be an lvalue, -i isn't an lvalue so you get the error.

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1  
I think SLaks has the correct term for this. It's not temporaries but r/lvalues. –  Captain Giraffe Jun 3 '11 at 17:23
2  
@Nawaz: I don't think so. You stated that the answer was unconvincing since you could do something similar with a member operator++, which is a completely unrelated problem. Consider struct A {}; A operator++( A & ); ++A(); Ooops... you cannot call operator++ there. You changed the problem (from a built in preincrement to a member preincrement) and then stated that this answer does not solved your modified problem. And after it has been explained to you what the difference is, you are not able to accept that you made a mistake. All of us make mistakes, that is how we learn. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 3 '11 at 17:41
3  
@Xaade: You should replace the main with ++(-A()), currently there are no temporaries in the program. And I never claimed that you cannot have an lvalue expression referring to a temporary (there are many ways of doing it), but I still find it amusing that the same people over and over, and without really understanding the issue nitpick on others just because they can write some similar (not equivalent) code that seems to work. I would have taken it much better if there was some constructive criticism on the terminology (I just did it in Slaks answer about 10min ago) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 3 '11 at 17:51
2  
@Nawaz: Your exact comment was: I don't think its a correct answer. You can apply ++ on a temporary : ideone.com/cv9oI. That does not say that you find temporary misleading, but that you think that the answer is wrong because by transforming the problem into call a member function you can call a member function on a temporary. Again, using that code does not even hint that you are talking about the difference of temporary and rvalue, in both cases the objects are temporaries and the expressions are rvalue expressions. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 3 '11 at 17:57
2  
@Nawaz: seriously, a broken clock gives the right time twice a day. The answer is (and the first version of it was) quite clear. It uses the -i expression, that yields a temporary of type int, and an rvalue and it also says that ++ requires an lvalue. While it could be better --it could avoid mentioning temporary, it could specify that ++ requires an lvalue unless it is overridden as class member function, that is out of the scope of the question. It could be better, but it is not wrong by any means. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 3 '11 at 18:11

The ++ operator increments a variable. (Or, to be more precise, an lvalue—something that can appear on the left side of an assignment expression)

(-i) isn't a variable, so it doesn't make sense to increment it.

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I find the similarity of variable and lvalue much better than alternative can appear on the left side of an assignment expression. I have seen many people arguing that you cannot have an expression that yields a constant lvalue because that cannot be used as the left hand side of an assignment (Given const int& foo();, foo(); is an lvalue expression, and yet you are not allowed --for other reasons-- to assign to it) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 3 '11 at 17:33

Try this instead:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
   int i = 10;
   printf("%d\n", (++i) * -1);
}
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You can't increment a temporary that doesn't have an identity. You need to store that in something to increment it. You can think of an l-value as something that can appear on the left side of an expression, but in eventually you'll need to think of it in terms of something that has an identity but cannot be moved (C++0x terminology). Meaning that it has an identity, a reference, refers to an object, something you'd like to keep.

(-i) has NO identity, so there's nothing to refer to it. With nothing to refer to it there's no way to store something in it. You can't refer to (-i), therefore, you can't increment it.

try i = -i + 1

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
   int i = 10;
   printf("%d\n", -i + 1); // <-- No Error Here
}
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