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If I have a string like

a/{b,c,d}/e

then I want to be able to produce this output:

a/b/e
a/c/e
a/d/e

You get the idea. I need to implement this in C. I have written a brute force kind of code which i capable of parsing a single pair of braces (for example: /a/{b,c,d}/e/ but if there are multiple pair of braces, like /a/{b,c}/{d,e}/f in that case my method will break. I would like to take a better approach.

I am not asking directly for the code, just a hint towards an efficient algorithm would be sufficient. I think the task of parsing the braces is repetitive and we could follow a recursive algorithm?

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1  
It looks like a simple regexp parsing. Have a look at finite state machines (FSM a.k.a. deterministic finite automata, DFA). –  Eimantas Jun 3 '11 at 17:46
    
yes, that was my initial thought as well, I seem to be rough on my concepts of Automata theory. Maybe I should pick up the book again and revise the concepts :) –  Abhinav Upadhyay Jun 3 '11 at 18:06
    
You can, of course, take a look at the zsh/bash/csh source code (xpandbraces in glob.c for zsh, brace_expand in braces.c for bash etc.) –  vladr Nov 26 '12 at 21:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're on any kind of Unix, Linux or OS X system, there is a built in library function to do this. man 3 glob will tell you about how to call it from C. Or you can visit http://linux.die.net/man/3/glob to find online documentation.

If you want to roll your own, a simple way to go is to first scan the string and build an intermediate data structure, and then recursively walk that data structure, printing strings. That data structure could be built out of structs with the following fields:

  • text: pointer to a piece of string
  • next_node: pointer to what comes after this text when printed
  • sibling_node: pointer to the next choice that could be made instead of this one
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for telling about glob(3). It seems to be solving my problem, although the brace expansion feature is non-standard addition to it, but it is available on Linux and BSDs, which is pretty much I want. Although, having spent so much time on this problem, a solution to how to do it myself would be great. :) –  Abhinav Upadhyay Jun 3 '11 at 18:05
    
@Abhinav Upadhyay: I added one direction you can go to roll your own. –  btilly Jun 3 '11 at 18:19
    
Wow, your solution looks so simple. +1 –  Thai Jun 3 '11 at 18:48

What you're showing here isn't really recursive. If you could nest the brackets, then that would be recursive.

basically what you have is a simple grammar:

thing ::= element { "/" element }*
element ::= symbol || list
list ::= "{" symbol { "," symbol }* "}"
symbol ::= [a-z]+

That's a off the cuff grammar language. * means "zero or more", + means "1 or more". Fairly common.

So, you need a simple tokenizer, something that groups up your symbols and separates out the punctuation mostly.

Then a simple parser

parseThing() {
    Element e = parseElement();
    while (nextToken != null) {
        Slash s = parseSlash();
        e = parseElement():
    }
}

Slash parseSlash() {
    Token t = peekNextToken();
    if (t.getText().equals("/")) {
        return new Slash();
    }
    throw "expected a '/' but got a " + t;
}

Element parseElement() {
    Token t = peekNextToken();
    if (t.isSymbol()) {
        return parseSymbol();
    }
    if (t.isOpenCurly()) {
        return parseList());
    }
    thrown "Syntax error, wanted a symbol or { and got " + t;
}

List parseList() {
    List l = new List();
    Token t = peekNextToken();
    if (t.isOpenCurly()) {
        consumeNextToken();
        Symbol s = parseSymbol();
        l.add(s);
        t = peekNextToken();
        while (t.isComma()) {
            consumeNextToken();
            s = parseSymbol();
            l.add(s);
            t = peekNextToken();
        }
        if (!t.closeCurly()) {
            throw "expected close of list, but got " + t;
        }
        consumeNextToken();
     } else {
         throw "expected start of list but got " + t;
     }
     return l;
}

Symbol parseSymbol() {
    Token t = peekNextToken();

    if(!t.isSymbol()) {
        throw "expected symbol, got " + t;
    }
    consumeNextToken();
    return new Symbol(t);
}

This is incomplete, and high level, but gives you an idea of how you could go about it.

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Actually you can nest brackets. Try echo {foo,b{a,i}r} and you'll get 3 lines out. –  btilly Jun 3 '11 at 21:12
    
@btilly: but I think Will Hartung's point is that the questioner didn't describe something recursive, just repetitive. The fact that shells offer the possibility of recursive parsing is cool, but recursion isn't necessary to do what the question asks for. –  iconoclast Jul 14 '11 at 17:51
    
@iconoclast: The questioner asked for "BASH/CSH/ZSH style brace expansion" and described the first problem his code had. If that's what he wants, nested braces will be the next problem he encounters. –  btilly Jul 14 '11 at 19:42

I have been doing something like this recently, and it took me a lot of time to solve this, so here's how I do it. There may be a simpler algorithm for this though.

You can write a recursive descent parser to transform the text into the tree. Make the strings leaf nodes that holds that string and the matched pair of braces an internal node. Each leaf node can contain more than one string.

For example, this:

/a/{b,c}/{d,e{f,g,h}}/i

can become:

(
   ["/a/"]
   {
      ( ["b"] )
      ( ["c"] )
   }
   ["/"]
   {
      ( ["d"] )
      (
         ["e"]
         {
            ( ["f"] )
            ( ["g"] )
            ( ["h"] )
         }
      )
   }
   ["i"]
)

Try to look at it as a tree, where ["stringA", "stringB"] denotes a leaf node, and matched pair of braces represents an internal node. There are 2 types of internal node, one that can choose between one of the alternatives (I use {} in this example) and one that combines all the combination (I use () here).

So, the above tree would go like this:

(
   ["/a/"]
   {
      ["b"]
      ["c"]
   }
   ["/"]
   {
      ["d"]
      (
         ["e"]
         {
            ["f"]
            ["g"]
            ["h"]
         }
      )
   }
   ["i"]
)

then

(
   ["/a/"]
   ["b", "c"]
   ["/"]
   {
      ["d"]
      (
         ["e"]
         ["f", "g", "h"]
      )
   }
   ["i"]
)

then

(
   ["/a/"]
   ["b", "c"]
   ["/"]
   {
      ["d"]
      ["ef", "eg", "eh"]
   }
   ["i"]
)

then

(
   ["/a/"]
   ["b", "c"]
   ["/"]
   ["d", "ef", "eg", "eh"]
   ["i"]
)

and finally, you end up with a single leaf node, which are all the combinations:

["/a/b/di", "/a/b/efi", "/a/b/egi", "/a/b/ehi",
 "/a/c/di", "/a/c/efi", "/a/c/egi", "/a/c/ehi"]

Then you can pretty print it.

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1  
A useful trick in this case. It is easier to build up the data structure if you work from the end of the string to the beginning. That is because that way you have the parent and/or sibling node, and you never will need to backtrack. –  btilly Jun 3 '11 at 21:16

Dunno about efficient, but an intuitive way would be to use some form of recursion. The function should be able to find the first brace. Say the first brace contains N alternatives. So the function produces N expansions, and recursively calls itself upon each expansion. Each "fork" keeps on forking till it exhausts every brace.

Does that help?

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I had also thought of a similar approach, but I didn't try to implement it because it will require keeping track of a large number of strings with each level of recursion, and it will require continuous memory allocations. That said, it seems a viable approach. Maybe a linked list could be used to store the strings. –  Abhinav Upadhyay Jun 3 '11 at 18:18

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