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I'm working on a C++ project that needs to run many jobs in a threadpool. The jobs are failure-prone, which means that I need to know how each job terminated after it completes. Being a Java programmer for the most part, I like the idea of using "futures" or a similar paradigm, akin to the various classes in Java's util.concurrent package.

I have two questions: first, does something like this already exist for C++ (I haven't found anything in Boost, but maybe I'm not looking hard enough); and second, is this even a sane idea for C++?

I found a brief example of what I'm trying to accomplish here:

http://www.boostcookbook.com/Recipe:/1234841

Does this approach make sense?

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1  
It looks like this describes a method of passing results between the threads. Since threads share memory and they're all under your control why does this need a meta structure applied to it? Why not simply create a concrete class to contain your results and signal when the results are available. – Jay Jun 3 '11 at 18:14
1  
Great question, Jay. The real reason we want to use the futures paradigm is so that we can hoist exceptions from an asynchronous task to a joining thread. – Tom Jun 17 '11 at 17:51
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Futures are both present in the upcoming standard (C++0x) and inside boost. Note that while the main name future is the same, you will need to read into the documentation to locate other types and to understand the semantics. I don't know Java futures, so I cannot tell you where they differ, if they do.

The library in boost was written by Anthony Williams, that I believe was also involved in the definition of that part of the standard. He has also written C++ Concurrency in Action, that includes a good description of futures, tasks, promises and related objects. His company also sells a complete and up to implementation of the C++0x threading libraries, if you are interested.

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Thanks for the info. We ended up migrating our project to C++0x specifically for this reason. – Tom Jun 17 '11 at 17:52
    
This answer is correct, but you still may consider using the boost version as they provide the super useful "wait_for_any" and "wait_for_all". – tgoodhart Jun 18 '11 at 21:02
    
An update: we ended up going back to boost anyhow. Nevertheless, thanks to both of you for the info. – Tom Nov 9 '11 at 17:04

Boost has futures and other threading tools implemented.

Note that when you call the get() method on a boost::unique_future it will re-throw any exception that might have been stored inside it during asynchronous execution.

I would suggest you do something like:

#pragma once

#include <tbb/concurrent_queue.h>

#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/noncopyable.hpp>

#include <functional>

namespace internal
{
    template<typename T>
    struct move_on_copy
    {
        move_on_copy(const move_on_copy<T>& other) : value(std::move(other.value)){}
        move_on_copy(T&& value) : value(std::move(value)){}
        mutable T value;
    };

    template<typename T>
    move_on_copy<T> make_move_on_copy(T&& value)
    {
        return move_on_copy<T>(std::move(value));
    }
}

class executor : boost::noncopyable
{
    boost::thread thread_;

    tbb::concurrent_bounded_queue<std::function<void()>> execution_queue_;

    template<typename Func>
    auto create_task(Func&& func) -> boost::packaged_task<decltype(func())> // noexcept
    {   
        typedef boost::packaged_task<decltype(func())> task_type;

        auto task = task_type(std::forward<Func>(func));            

        task.set_wait_callback(std::function<void(task_type&)>([=](task_type& my_task) // The std::function wrapper is required in order to add ::result_type to functor class.
        {
            try
            {
                if(boost::this_thread::get_id() == thread_.get_id())  // Avoids potential deadlock.
                    my_task();
            }
            catch(boost::task_already_started&){}
        }));

        return std::move(task);
    }

public:

    explicit executor() // noexcept
    {
        thread_ = boost::thread([this]{run();});
    }

    ~executor() // noexcept
    {   
        execution_queue_.push(nullptr); // Wake the execution thread.
        thread_.join();
    }

    template<typename Func>
    auto begin_invoke(Func&& func) -> boost::unique_future<decltype(func())> // noexcept
    {   
        // Create a move on copy adaptor to avoid copying the functor into the queue, tbb::concurrent_queue does not support move semantics.
        auto task_adaptor = internal::make_move_on_copy(create_task(func));

        auto future = task_adaptor.value.get_future();

        execution_queue_.push([=]
        {
            try{task_adaptor.value();}
            catch(boost::task_already_started&){}
        });

        return std::move(future);       
    }

    template<typename Func>
    auto invoke(Func&& func) -> decltype(func()) // noexcept
    {
        if(boost::this_thread::get_id() == thread_.get_id())  // Avoids potential deadlock.
            return func();

        return begin_invoke(std::forward<Func>(func), prioriy).get();
    }

private:

    void run() // noexcept
    {
        while(true)
        {
            std::function<void()> func;
            execution_queue_.pop(func); 
                    if(!func)
                       break;
            func();
        }
    }   
};
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C++ templates are less restrictive than Java Generics so 'Future's could readily be ported with them and thread synchronization primitives. As for existing libraries which support such a mechanism, hopefully someone else knows of one.

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