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I need to implement this:


static class MyStaticClass
{
  public const TimeSpan theTime = new TimeSpan(13, 0, 0);
  public static bool IsTooLate(DateTime dt)
  {
    return dt.TimeOfDay >= theTime;
  }
}

theTime is a constant (seriously :-), like π is, in my case it'd be pointless to read it from settings, for example). And I'd like it to be initialized once and never change. But C# doesn't seem to allow a constant to be initialized by a function (which a constructor is). How to overcome this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Using readonly instead of const can be initialized and not modified after that. Is that what you're looking for?

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1  
Downvoters: please explain why you are downvoting an answer that solved the OP's question. If it's not a good solution at least explain why. –  ashelvey Jun 3 '11 at 23:13

Constants have to be compile time constant, and the compiler can't evaluate your constructor at compile time. Use readonly and a static constructor.

static class MyStaticClass
{
  static MyStaticClass()
  {
     theTime = new TimeSpan(13, 0, 0);
  }

  public static readonly TimeSpan theTime;
  public static bool IsTooLate(DateTime dt)
  {
    return dt.TimeOfDay >= theTime;
  }
}

In general I prefer to initialise in the constructor rather than by direct assignment as you have control over the order of initialisation.

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theTime should be static as well. So that there's only one, and so that the above example compiles. –  pickypg Jun 3 '11 at 18:48
2  
Why a constructor? Just describing a member as public static readonly TimeSpan theTime = new TimeSpan(13, 0, 0) seems to work (no compilation errors at least). –  Ivan Jun 3 '11 at 18:49
4  
@pickypg - sorry my mistake - fixed. @Ivan - I added a comment on that. I personally dislike direct initialisation as you need to search a class to find out where things are initialised. Putting initialisation always in the constructor is consistent and you can easily see what the initial state of a class is. You also have direct control over the order in which initialisation takes place. In a trivial static class case there probably isn't much difference. But good practice is good practice - especially in the edge cases. –  James Gaunt Jun 3 '11 at 18:53
4  
The greatest benefit to using a ctor for member initialization is that you get the opportunity to catch and handle exceptions in the context that they are raised. –  Steve Guidi Jun 3 '11 at 19:00

C#'s const does not have the same meaning as C++'s const. In C#, const is used to essentially define aliases to literals (and can therefore only be initialized with literals). readonly is closer to what you want, but keep in mind that it only affects the assignment operator (the object isn't really constant unless its class has immutable semantics).

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From this link:

Constants must be a value type (sbyte, byte, short, ushort, int, uint, long, ulong, char, float, double, decimal, or bool), an enumeration, a string literal, or a reference to null.

If you want to create an object, it must be done so as static readonly:

static class MyStaticClass
{
  public static readonly TimeSpan theTime = new TimeSpan(13, 0, 0);
  public static bool IsTooLate(DateTime dt)
  {
    return dt.TimeOfDay >= theTime;
  }
}
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public static readonly TimeSpan theTime = new TimeSpan(13, 0, 0);
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