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What are the differences between List, List<?>, List<T>, List<E>, and List<Object>?

Now I do not blindly ask this question, so please don't close this thread. Let me first introduce the base code:

private static List<String> names = new ArrayList<String>();
static {
    names.add("Tom");
    names.add("Peter");
    names.add("Michael");
    names.add("Johnson");
    names.add("Vlissides");
}

public static void test(List<String> set){
    System.out.println(set);
}
public static void main(String args[]){
    test(names);
}

I do understand that:

1.List: is a raw type, therefore not typesafe. It will only generate a runtime error when the casting is bad. We want a compile time error when the cast is bad. Not recommended to use.

2.List<?>: is an unbounded wildcard. But not sure what this is for? So if I change the test method to

public static void test(List<?> set){
    System.out.println(set);
}

it still works good. If you can explain the usage of this, I would greatly appreciate it.

EDIT: If I do this:

public static void test(List<?> set){
    set.add(new Long(2)); //--> Error
    set.add("2");    //--> Error
    System.out.println(set);
}

but if I change test to this:

public static void test(List<String> set){
    set.add(new Long(2)); //--> Error
    set.add("2");    //--> Work
    System.out.println(set);
}

3.List<T>:

public static void test(List<T> set){   //T cannot be resolved
    System.out.println(set);
}

I guess I don't understand this syntax. I saw something like this, and it works:

public <T> T[] toArray(T[] a){
    return a;   
}

Please explain this for me please? Sometimes, I see <T>, or <E>, or <U>, <T,E>. Are they all the same or do they represent something different?

4.List<Object>

public static void test(List<Object> set){
    System.out.println(set);
}

Then I got the error The method test(List<Object>) is not application for the argument List<String> for the below code. I am confused. I thought String was a subset of Object?

public static void main(String args[]){
    test(names); 
}

EDIT: If I try this

test((List<Object>)names);

then I got Cannot cast from List<String> to List<Object>

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10  
No offense, but I think you need to spend some time learning about generics in Java. –  Bernard Jun 3 '11 at 19:57
1  
@Bernard: None taken –  Thang Pham Jun 3 '11 at 20:01
1  
@Op: How is it broad? I numerically create five bullet point. I wrote code to demonstrate my understand. I did not blindly ask, what is java generic type, and how to use it?, therefore I am not sure how it is a broad question. –  Thang Pham Jun 3 '11 at 20:06
1  
@Op: I really just want to learn, and I dont want to argue with you about whether my question is broad or not? Therefore, I am sorry that I ask this too broad question, and somehow annoy you very much. However, if you are insist on it. Then I am reading Effective Java by Joshua Bloch, on item 23, 24. Even though, it is a great book, the explanation is a bit hard for me to understand. And when i try to write some codes to confirm my understand, I do not understand the above questions. Once again, my apologized. –  Thang Pham Jun 3 '11 at 20:34
2  
@Harry: Effective Java assumes that you know the basics about generics. Good place to start is: http://www.angelikalanger.com/GenericsFAQ/JavaGenericsFAQ.html, Java Generics and Collections form Naftalin, or if you like good combination of theoretical and practical approach, read The Java Programming Language 3rd ed –  Op De Cirkel Jun 3 '11 at 20:46

9 Answers 9

up vote 22 down vote accepted

1) Correct

2) You can think of that one as "read only" list, where you don't care about the type of the items.Could e.g. be used by a method that is returning the length of the list.

3) T, E and U are the same, but people tend to use e.g. T for type, E for Element, V for value and K for key. The method that compiles says that it taked an array of a certain type, and returns an array of the same type.

4) You can't mix oranges and apples. You would be able to add an Object to your String list if you could pass a string list to a method that expects object lists. (And not all objects are strings)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for read only list on 2. I write some codes to demonstrate this in 2. tyvm –  Thang Pham Jun 3 '11 at 20:19
    
Why would people use List<Object> for? –  Thang Pham Jun 3 '11 at 20:22
1  
It's a way to create a list that accepts any type of items, you seldom use it. –  Kaj Jun 3 '11 at 20:26
    
Actually I wouldn't think anyone would use it considering you can not have an identifier at all now. –  if_zero_equals_one Jun 3 '11 at 21:22
    
@if_zero_equals_one. That sounds wrong, what do you mean by that? –  Kaj Jun 3 '11 at 21:26

For the last part: Although String is a subset of Object, but List<String> is not inherited from List<Object>.

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6  
Very good point; many assume that because class C inherits from class P, that List<C> also inherits from List<P>. As you pointed out this is not the case. The reason why was that if we could cast from List<String> to List<Object>, then we could put Objects into that list, thus violating the original contract of List<String> when attempting to retrieve an element. –  Peter Jun 3 '11 at 20:21
    
+1. Good point as well. So why would people use List<Object> for? –  Thang Pham Jun 3 '11 at 20:23
1  
List<Object> can be used to store a list of objects of different classes. –  Farshid Zaker Jun 3 '11 at 20:25

The notation List<?> means "a list of anything". Since the code in test works for any kind of object in the list, this works as a formal method parameter.

Using a type parameter (like in your point 3), requires that the type parameter be declared. The Java syntax for that is to put <T> in front of the function. This is exactly analogous to declaring formal parameter names to a method before using the names in the method body.

Regarding List<Object> not accepting a List<String>, that makes sense because a String is not Object; it is a subclass of Object. The fix is to declare public static void test(List<? extends Object> set) .... But then the extends Object is redundant, because every class directly or indirectly extends Object.

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Why would people use List<Object> for? –  Thang Pham Jun 3 '11 at 20:22
3  
I think "a list of something" is a better meaning for List<?> since the list is of some specific but unknown type. List<Object> would really be "a list of anything" since it can indeed contain anything. –  ColinD Jun 3 '11 at 21:45
    
@ColinD - I meant "anything" in the sense of "any one thing". But you're right; it means, "a list of something, but I'm not going to tell you what". –  Ted Hopp Jun 5 '11 at 2:52

I would advise reading Java puzzlers. It explains inheritance, generics, abstractions, and wildcards in declarations quite well. http://www.javapuzzlers.com/

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The reason you cannot cast List<String> to List<Object> is that it would allow you to violate the constraints of the List<String>.

Think about the following scenario: If I have a List<String>, it is supposed to only contain objects of type String. (Which is a final class)

If I can cast that to a List<Object>, then that allows me to add Object to that list, thus violating the original contract of List<String>.

Thus, in general, if class C inherits from class P, you cannot say that GenericType<C> also inherits from GenericType<P>.

N.B. I already commented on this in a previous answer but wanted to expand on it.

share|improve this answer
    
tyvm, I upload both your comment and your answer, since it is a very good explanation. Now where and why would people use List<Object>? –  Thang Pham Jun 3 '11 at 20:28
1  
Generally you should not use List<Object> as it sort of defeats the purpose of generics. However, there are cases where old code might have a List accepting different types, so you might want to retrofit the code to use type parameterization just to avoid compiler warnings for raw types. (But the functionality is unchanged) –  Peter Jun 3 '11 at 20:34

in your third point, "T" cannot be resolved because its not declared, usually when you declare a generic class you can use "T" as the name of the bound type parameter, many online examples including oracle's tutorials use "T" as the name of the type parameter, say for example, you declare a class like

public class FooHandler<T>
{
   public void operateOnFoo(T foo) { /*some foo handling code here*/}

}

you are saying that FooHandler's operateOnFoo method expects a variable of type "T" wich is declared on the class declaration itself, with this in mind, you can latter add another method like

public void operateOnFoos(List<T> foos)

in all the cases either T, E or U there all identifiers of the type parameter, you can even have more than one type parameter wich uses the sintax

public class MyClass<Atype,AnotherType> {}

in your forth ponint although efectively Sting is a sub type of Object, in generics classes there is no such relation, List<String> is not a sub type of List<Object> they are two diferent types from the compiler point of view, this is best explained in this blog entry

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You're right: String is a subset of Object. Since String is more "precise" than Object, you should cast it to use it as an argument for System.out.println().

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Problem 2 is OK, because " System.out.println(set);" means "System.out.println(set.toString());" set is an instance of List, so complier will call List.toString();

public static void test(List<?> set){
set.add(new Long(2)); //--> Error  
set.add("2");    //--> Error
System.out.println(set);
} 
Element ? will not promise Long and String, so complier will  not accept Long and String Object

public static void test(List<String> set){
set.add(new Long(2)); //--> Error
set.add("2");    //--> Work
System.out.println(set);
}
Element String promise it a String, so complier will accept String Object

Problem 3: these symbols are same, but you can give them differet specification. For example:

public <T extends Integer,E extends String> void p(T t, E e) {}

Problem 4: Collection does not allow type parameter covariance. But array does allow covariance.

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let us talk about them in java history ;

  1. List : List means can include any Object List is in the realse befor jave 5.0 ;java 5.0 introduce List , for backward compatible ,

    List list=new ArrayList(); list.add(anyObject)

  2. List ? means unKnow Object not any Object ; the wildcard ? introducetion is beacause to solve the problem built by Generic Type ; see http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/extra/generics/wildcards.html ; but this also cause another problem

    Collection c = new ArrayList(); c.add(new Object()); // Compile time error

    see answer also in http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/extra/generics/wildcards.html ;

  3. List< T> List< E> meaas generic Declaration at the premise of none T or E type in your project Lib

  4. List< Object> means generic parameterization

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