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I have a question about templates that can be used with parameters that are either a class or a primitive type. Here's some sample code:

(Note: I have real code that's more complex, the following code is useless but it reproduces the same issue)

template<typename T>
class Foo
{
  T value;

public:
  Foo() {}
  const T& getValue() const { return value; }
  Foo& setValue(const T& other) { 
    value = other; return *this; 
  }
};

struct Bar
{
  int x;

  Bar() : x(3) {}
};

int doit()
{
  Foo<int> fooint;
  Bar bar;
  bar.x = 44;
  Foo<Bar> foobar;

  fooint.setValue(3);      // warning here
  foobar.setValue(bar);

  int y = foobar.getValue().x + fooint.getValue();
  return y;
}

I get a compiler remark on fooint.setValue():

value copied to temporary, reference to temporary used

I understand the remark. What I'm wondering is how I should handle Foo::setValue() if I'm going to use Foo with both primitives and class/struct types as template parameters.

I thought setValue(const T& other) was the right method signature for passing in a constant class by reference.

Is there a way to make setValue() so it "does the right thing" both for Foo<int> and Foo<Bar>?

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1  
Which compiler do you use? –  Xeo Jun 3 '11 at 21:05
    
That is perfectly fine. I don't think that is harmful in any way. –  Nawaz Jun 3 '11 at 21:07
    
It's a TI compiler for their 28xx DSPs. On a regular PC I wouldn't care about this, but in an embedded system, it has me slightly concerned. –  Jason S Jun 3 '11 at 21:11
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It is perfectly legal to bind temporaries to const references as you do in setValue(). Intel C++, which issues this remark, is not being helpful in this case.

EDIT: I am guessing that TI compiler is based on Intel, which, for me, issues the following diagnostic on that line:

test.cc(28): remark #383: value copied to temporary, reference to temporary used
    fooint.setValue(3);      // warning here

The diagnostic is discussed on http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/cdiag383/ where it says

Can safely ignore this warning for pushback function of vector. The vector copies the argument into its own storage; it never stores the original argument. Therefore, using a temporary is perfectly safe.

In your case, you're also copying the argument, therefore it can also be ignored.

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I see nothing wrong with your code. GCC compiles it without errors or warnings.

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To answer your last question of getting Foo<T>::setValue() to do the 'right thing' you can consider using template specialization to accomplish that -- a fairly common technique used in template metaprogramming. Something like this for example:

template <typename T>
struct Ref_or_Value
{
    typedef T& type;
};

template <typename T>
struct Ref_or_Value<T *>
{
    typedef T* type;
};

template <>
struct Ref_or_Value<int>
{
    typedef int type;
};

// add other primitive types like above as need

The Foo<T>::setValue signature then becomes:

Foo& setValue(const typename Ref_or_Value<T>::type other);

Whether this is overkill or not I'll let you decide but this should get setValue to do the 'right thing'. If T=int then setValue will take arguments by value. If T=Foobar_object then it will be by const reference.

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What's wrong with taking an int by reference? Template classes do this sort of thing all the time (e.g. vector::push_back(T&)). –  HighCommander4 Jun 3 '11 at 21:34
1  
@HighCommander4, vector::push_back takes its parameter by const reference. If it took it by non-const reference, you wouldn't be able to append a literal int value at all. What Jason's compiler is warning about, apparently, is that it has to generate a temporary for that literal so that it can create a reference for it. And that's what's wrong with passing an int by reference. For compilers that can't optimize that away, you'd want to make sure parameters get passed the best possible way, whatever their type. Victor's Ref_or_Value template does that. –  Rob Kennedy Jun 3 '11 at 21:49
    
Sorry, I did of course mean vector::push_back(const T&). My point was, if this were a problem surely vector would have come with specializations for built-in types to maximize efficiency? –  HighCommander4 Jun 3 '11 at 22:09
    
@HighCommander4 that compiler needlessly warns about vector::push_back too, see my edit. –  Cubbi Jun 3 '11 at 22:19
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Doesn't produce any warning/error/whatsoever for me on Visual Studio 2010. It is very weird that your compiler shows that diagnostic, as it's non-sense. 3 is an rvalue, and rvalues are explicitly allowed to bind to constant references like const int&.

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