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What purpose does name have in the following statement?

var myArray =[], name;

I usually initialize my arrays as the following:

var myArray =[];
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8 Answers 8

It is shorthand to

var myArray =[];
var name;

It is matter of personal preference.

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Please also vote on similar answers. –  Midas Jun 3 '11 at 21:21
    
this is not technically true, is it? Wouldn't the scoping of name be global even if it were defined in a function? –  ShaneBlake Jun 3 '11 at 21:25
    
@ShaneBlake absolutely not - exactly the opposite in fact. –  Pointy Jun 3 '11 at 21:27
4  
@ShaneBlake - As long as name is declared with var it will be scoped within the current scope be it global or function. –  ChaosPandion Jun 3 '11 at 21:27
    
@ShaneBlake, the style of writing in these two ways doesn't impact anything about the scope. –  amit_g Jun 3 '11 at 21:29

You are actually initialising two variables there, myArray and name.

You set myArray to [] and name to undefined, because you don't give any value.

Your code is equivalent to this:

var myArray = [];
var name;
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It is equal to this:

var myArray =[];
var name;
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In JavaScript multiple variable assignments can be separated by commas, eliminating the need for repetitive var statements.

var myArray = [];
var name;

is equivalent to

var myArray = [], name;
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This is equivalent to

var myArray =[];
var name;
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It doesn't affect myArray, it's just the same thing as

var myArray = [];
var name;
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It's essentially the instantiation of a second variable name with no value.

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The recommended way (clean and short as possible) of writing this kind of code is the following:

var myArray = [],
    name;
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