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input: phrase 1, phrase 2

output: semantic similarity value (between 0 and 1), or the probability these two phrases are talking about the same thing

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WordNet Similarity for Java online demo was helpful in getting a feel for the different algorithms provided by WordNet: ws4jdemo.appspot.com –  Ahmed Fasih Aug 5 at 7:19

12 Answers 12

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You might want to check out this paper:

Sentence similarity based on semantic nets and corpus statistics (PDF)

I've implemented the algorithm described. Our context was very general (effectively any two English sentences) and we found the approach taken was too slow and the results, while promising, not good enough (or likely to be so without considerable, extra, effort).

You don't give a lot of context so I can't necessarily recommend this but reading the paper could be useful for you in understanding how to tackle the problem.

Regards,

Matt.

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1  
I've implemented the algorithm too, it's not good enough but acceptable –  btw0 Oct 13 '08 at 15:22

There's a short and a long answer to this.

The short answer:

Use the WordNet::Similarity Perl package. If Perl is not your language of choice, check the WordNet project page at Princeton, or google for a wrapper library.

The long answer:

Determining word similarity is a complicated issue, and research is still very hot in this area. To compute similarity, you need an appropriate represenation of the meaning of a word. But what would be a representation of the meaning of, say, 'chair'? In fact, what is the exact meaning of 'chair'? If you think long and hard about this, it will twist your mind, you will go slightly mad, and finally take up a research career in Philosophy or Computational Linguistics to find the truth™. Both philosophers and linguists have tried to come up with an answer for literally thousands of years, and there's no end in sight.

So, if you're interested in exploring this problem a little more in-depth, I highly recommend reading Chapter 20.7 in Speech and Language Processing by Jurafsky and Martin, some of which is available through Google Books. It gives a very good overview of the state-of-the-art of distributional methods, which use word co-occurrence statistics to define a measure for word similarity. You are not likely to find libraries implementing these, however.

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I would look into latent semantic indexing for this. I believe you can create something similar to a vector space search index but with semantically related terms being closer together i.e. having a smaller angle between them. If I learn more I will post here.

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To amplify: get a representative (large) text corpus, decompose each document into bigrams ("terms"), make a matrix counting occurrence of terms (rows) in documents (columns), decompose the matrix, round/project/reduce dimensionality, use the result to make new predictions. –  isomorphismes Mar 13 '13 at 1:12

You might want to check into the WordNet project at Princeton University. One possible approach to this would be to first run each phrase through a stop-word list (to remove "common" words such as "a", "to", "the", etc.) Then for each of the remaining words in each phrase, you could compute the semantic "similarity" between each of the words in the other phrase using a distance measure based on WordNet. The distance measure could be something like: the number of arcs you have to pass through in WordNet to get from word1 to word2.

Sorry this is pretty high-level. I've obviously never tried this. Just a quick thought.

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I would have a look at statistical techniques that take into consideration the probability of each word to appear within a sentence. This will allow you to give less importance to popular words such as 'and', 'or', 'the' and give more importance to words that appear less regurarly, and that are therefore a better discriminating factor. For example, if you have two sentences:

1) The smith-waterman algorithm gives you a similarity measure between two strings. 2) We have reviewed the smith-waterman algorithm and we found it to be good enough for our project.

The fact that the two sentences share the words "smith-waterman" and the words "algorithms" (which are not as common as 'and', 'or', etc.), will allow you to say that the two sentences might indeed be talking about the same topic.

Summarizing, I would suggest you have a look at: 1) String similarity measures; 2) Statistic methods;

Hope this helps.

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Gia: the following strings are similar: (I love you, I hate you) but have opposite meanings. The following strings are dissimilar but have similar meanings: (Thank you; the dinner was delicious!, You always cook a fine meal. Much appreciated.) Using an uncommon word: (An onomatopoeia is a word that imitates the sound of the thing it describes, Children and non-natives use onomatopoeia to describe things more than adult native speakers.) are not saying the same thing. –  isomorphismes Mar 13 '13 at 1:08

try http://swoogle.umbc.edu/SimService/

It provides a service for computing top-n similar words and phrase similarity

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This requires your algorithm actually knows what your talking about. It can be done in some rudimentary form by just comparing words and looking for synonyms etc, but any sort of accurate result would require some form of intelligence.

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One simple solution is to use the dot product of character n-gram vectors. This is robust over ordering changes (which many edit distance metrics are not) and captures many issues around stemming. It also prevents the AI-complete problem of full semantic understanding.

To compute the n-gram vector, just pick a value of n (say, 3), and hash every 3-character sequence in the phrase into a vector. Normalize the vector to unit length, then take the dot product of different vectors to detect similarity.

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Yes, there is. Actually, it depends on what you are trying to compare. This tool works only for calculating how closely-related the sentences are, according to Semantic classifications of their words.

Please check my project: https://sourceforge.net/projects/mechaglot/

It is a new tool made to model my old one, by improving the speed and the need to have a database (which is not required with this new solution). Furthermore, it is not language dependent! so you can use it with any spoken/written language you want (except maybe for the ones that use pictograms). I have made it since my old tool has gained some popularity and raised a few interesting questions.

It is a new project I am maintaining, so please feel free to test it.

The test-run gives the following results:

---------START-----------
-Using the model method
Similarity between the sentences:
Pete and Rob have found a dog near the station.
Pete and Rob have never found a dog near the station.
is: 1.0
--------------------
Similarity between the sentences:
Patricia found a dog near the station.
It was a dog who found Pete and Rob under the snow.
is: 0.68698204
--------------------
Similarity between the sentences:
Patricia found a dog near the station.
I am fine, thanks!
is: 0.29550347
--------------------
Similarity between the sentences:
Hello there, how are you?
I am fine, thanks!
is: 0.37528354
The overall time to compute the examples using this method was: 174 nanoseconds.
--------------------
--------------------
-Using the fast method
Similarity between the sentences:
Pete and Rob have found a dog near the station.
Pete and Rob have never found a dog near the station.
is: 0.98825234
--------------------
Similarity between the sentences:
Patricia found a dog near the station.
It was a dog who found Pete and Rob under the snow.
is: 0.7043551
--------------------
Similarity between the sentences:
Patricia found a dog near the station.
I am fine, thanks!
is: 0.30880186
--------------------
Similarity between the sentences:
Hello there, how are you?
I am fine, thanks!
is: 0.38521636
The overall time to compute the examples using this method was: 21 nanoseconds.
---------END-----------
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Sorry to dig up an 6 year old question, but as I just came across this post today, I'll throw in an answer in case anyone else is looking for something similar.

cortical.io has developed a process for calculating the semantic similarity of two expressions and they have a demo of it up on their website. They offer a free API providing access to the functionality, so you can use it in your own application without having to implement the algorithm yourself.

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You can check this link also http://www.ijies.org/v1i9.php and open the paper titled: algorithm for automatic evaluation of single sentence descriptive answer.

Would be helpful for phrases or sentences matching.

Thanks Jeet arora

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1  
Note that link-only answers are discouraged, SO answers should be the end-point of a search for a solution (vs. yet another stopover of references, which tend to get stale over time). Please consider adding a stand-alone synopsis here, keeping the link as a reference. –  kleopatra Oct 10 '13 at 10:17

As far as simple methods go,

return ((double)rand())/RAND_MAX;

is as good as any. More complex solutions are available, involving huge thesauruses and knowledge bases, but practical results are still not much better than code above.

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2  
Actually, { return 0.5 } is even better - they are either similar or not. –  ima Sep 15 '08 at 13:18
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this answer is completely not-related to the questions –  mfawzymkh Mar 15 '12 at 5:46
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is it really necessary to write <irony>return ((double)rand())/RAND_MAX;</irony> –  andreas Dec 13 '12 at 12:59
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Sarcasm doesn't help the person asking the question. If you believe that there isn't any good way of accomplishing the goal, just tell the user your belief, instead of posting a sarcastic response that is bound to confuse newcomers. Answering questions like this is both rude and counterproductive. –  Jgolden1 Feb 16 at 23:06

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