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I have a container with numerous but variable blocks in it.

#container <- overflow hidden
  .block
  .block

I need one of those blocks to have a height with overflow hidden. The idea is, the .chat div would have a height, with overflow hidden and then inside that there would be a .chatlog div with overflow auto.

#container <- overflow hidden
  .block
  .block
  .chat.block <- need a overflow hidden
    .chatlog <- need a overflow auto
      .chatmsg
      .chatmsg
      .chatmsg
    .chatentry

The most obvious thing to do is to add up all the other blocks in the container and substract that from the container height. But that's sometimes unreliable if the other blocks load slowly or some such.

Is there something I can do with CSS that would keep the .chat.block in view and taking up all the remaining space not used by the other blocks.

Edit:

Here's an example: http://jsfiddle.net/Q923u/1/

The chat input is hidden because there are too many messages. I need to set the height of the .chat so that the input is shown.

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3  
Read your question a few times already, and still having trouble understanding what exactly you are after. Maybe it's just me, but sample html markup probably would help. –  Niklas Jun 3 '11 at 22:31
    
@Niklas I updated my question with a jsfiddle –  Mark Jun 3 '11 at 23:00
    
So you want this but without doing the JS calculation? –  melhosseiny Jun 8 '11 at 20:30
    
@melhosseiny ideally yeah. –  Mark Jun 12 '11 at 5:01
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7 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+100

How's this?

http://www.spookandpuff.com/examples/chatView.html

This uses a structure a little different to yours:

#container
    .blockContainer
        .block
        .block
        .block
    .chat
        .chatlog
            .msg
            .msg
            .msg
        .chatentry

This is so we can easily check the height of .blockContainer, and give the remaining height to .chat. This is done with a simple piece of jQuery-flavoured javascript:

//Cache the important elements to avoid looking them up when we refresh:
        var container = $('#container'),
            blockContainer = container.find('.blockContainer'),
            chatContainer = container.find('.chat'),
            chatLog = chatContainer.find('.chatlog');

        container.bind('refresh', function(){
            //Determine the height of .blockContainer, and give .chat the leftovers
            chatContainer.css('top', function(){
                return blockContainer.height(); //The 'top' property of the chat corresponds to the bottom of the block container
            });

        });

This binds a custom event called 'refresh' to the #container element - whenever you need the heights to be re-calculated, you trigger this event like so: container.trigger('refresh') (or $('#container').trigger('refresh') if you don't have the container cached like I have). You can trigger whenever a new chat or block item is added, when the window is resized, when an AJAX load finishes - it's up to you.

Feel free to take whatever you like from the example code - the styles there use 'conflicting absolute positions': more on the concept here: http://www.alistapart.com/articles/conflictingabsolutepositions/

The CSS is not the most well-organised, but it should get you started. The demo page includes some controls for adding new blocks and messages, so you can see how the layout reacts to more or less content.

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thanks, excellent demo. i'll be looking at this more closely. Position absolute is really interesting but gives up a lot of flexibility. –  Mark Jun 8 '11 at 3:49
    
A lot of people have that impression, because of the way position:absolute has traditionally been used, but I haven't found it to be the case with this technique. Check out the list apart article - used like this, it's really just a way of giving 4 co-ordinates to the edges of a box (top, right, bottom, left), and leaving the width and height fluid. It doesn't have much in common with the early days of position:absolute at all. –  Beejamin Jun 8 '11 at 4:17
1  
Thinking about this answer some more, i'm not sure why position absolute is needed in any case. This answer is similar the 'The most obvious thing to do is to add up all the other blocks in the container and substract that from the container height' solution proposed in the question, just that you're taking the blockContainer.height() rather than adding up all the other blocks. Not using absolute would have the same result I feel, so long as we're resizing after the other blocks are loaded –  Mark Jun 12 '11 at 5:19
    
That's true - you could set the height of the block, rather than the 'top' property. Personally, I like 'top' because it's giving the block the vital position co-ordinate, rather than 'height', which ends up putting the top at the right co-ordinate. It's doesn't make any practical difference, it just feels a bit more direct to me. –  Beejamin Jun 13 '11 at 20:43
    
OK time's up and you're the first to propose a resize event. Thanks for your help. –  Mark Jun 14 '11 at 5:56
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maybe im not understanding correctly, but couldn't you set the chat height to 100% to fill the rest of the outer container? something like this jsfiddle?

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That's what i'm going for, I don't understand how you did that 0.o jsfiddle.net/Q923u/2 I tried to put height 100% on my example but no go. Can you try it with my example please –  Mark Jun 3 '11 at 23:02
    
@Mark, a potential problem with pthurlow's approach is that the chat div extends beyond the border of the container. Because you're using margins, that approach will mess up your borders. If I were you, I'd just give the chat div a height and remove the chatlog div. Here's a jsfiddle. –  squidbe Jun 4 '11 at 0:02
    
@squidbe the question is how to determine the chat's height. Looking for a foolproof solution, JS is OK. The marins are not so important, no margins is OK too –  Mark Jun 4 '11 at 1:59
    
jsfiddle.net/Q923u/4 margins removed –  Mark Jun 4 '11 at 2:00
    
I think this is more along the lines of what you want right? jsfiddle.net/Q923u/5 –  pthurlow Jun 6 '11 at 0:27
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You might want to play around with position: absolute; and bottom: 0. There's probably a way to get it to do what you want, without using JS. Check out these:

  1. a JSFiddle I made for you http://jsfiddle.net/bT9kY/

  2. Another Stack Overflow question CSS: Make one central div's height expand to fill what's left in a FIXED-HEIGHT container

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Well what if the blocks have a margin? Then the absolute solution won't work –  Mark Jun 12 '11 at 4:53
    
And yes that is a very similar question, thanks –  Mark Jun 12 '11 at 5:14
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What caught my attention was this:

The most obvious thing to do is to add up all the other blocks in the container and substract that from the container height. But that's sometimes unreliable if the other blocks load slowly or some such.

Why? Why are blocks loading slowly? Why don't you know when blocks are loaded? It's simple enough to determine the height of a few HTML elements. It seems like your problem is timing. Make sure your bootstrapper or initializer has an event that fires when all blocks have been loaded, THEN do the resizing (or do it after each block has loaded, whichever is more pleasant for the user).

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You're right, this is one solution, trigger the resize after everything has loaded. I was hoping for a solution that might be easier to generalize, but this is ok as well –  Mark Jun 12 '11 at 4:54
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Here a solution, via jQuery. You may need to run the function each time on content update though. [See example in fiddle] May not be what you wanted, but it easy to get the height you needed, without going through all the items in the display and calculating its length. by getting its relative 'position value' You may need to change the 'id' / 'class' in the example for your deployment though.

$(document).ready(
    updateBlock();
);

function updateBlock( container, lastChild ) {
    $("container").height = $(".chat").position().top + $(".chat").height;
}

Also editing your css is required, and would default to the same effect (but you cant do adjustment then =/ )

#container {
 background: #ccc;
 width: 200px;
 overflow: hidden;
 //Remove height parameter
}

Final result: http://jsfiddle.net/ubGnM/

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#container
    .blockContainer
        .block
        .block
        .block
    .chatlog //Overflow auto
        .msg
        .msg
        .msg
    .block
        .chatentry

Cant you just place your chat box in another div element, then auto scroll the text content as needed.

function scrollDown(container) {
    container.scrollTop = container.scrollHeight;
}

$(document).ready( function() {
scrollDown(document.getElementById('toScroll')); 
    }
);

Example...

http://jsfiddle.net/zV2Bv/3/

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how about adding max-height to your .chatlog

 max-height: 5em;

look at: http://jsfiddle.net/LAgng/

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The question is how you would find the height you need to set –  Mark Jun 12 '11 at 20:31
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