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Is there any way to introduce the local variable "iWantThisHere" here, so i can call obj.n()

var obj = { 
    test: "sure", 
    n : function(){ console.log(iWantThisHere); }
};

i tried with:

function fake(methods){
    var F =  new Function('methods', "var iWantThisHere = 'u have it', obj = {}; for( var meth in methods){ obj[meth] = methods[meth] } return obj;");

    return F(methods); }

console.log(fake(obj), fake(obj).n());

i dont want to use globals here. Imagine a modul system where each modul uses for example a util class, which is defined for example in a App object. So i always have to type for eg App.utils.map or something like that. It would be nice to have a shortcut to this util function which is a local variable in the modul context itself.

EDIT --- theres no way to do that ----

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5  
Huh? What on earth are you talking about? –  SLaks Jun 3 '11 at 22:27
    
It's not at all clear what you want this variable to be, or to do, or anything else really. –  Pointy Jun 3 '11 at 22:27
    
Because of the way the scope chain works, you can introduce this variable in the global scope and it will pick up -- unless the script explicitly defines its own version within a local scope, in which case I don't see a great deal of hope: the function will always use the one in the scope it was defined in, if it's there. –  Reid Jun 3 '11 at 22:28
    
i dont want to use globals here. Imagine a modul system where each modul uses for example a util class, which is defined for example in a App object. So i always have to type for eg App.utils.map or something like that. It would be nice to have a shortcut to this util function which is a local variable in the modul context itself. –  Sep O Sep Jun 3 '11 at 22:33
1  
@Sep O Sep - well, there's simply no way to do what you want, unless you want to force all your module system's client code to define all it's functions as raw strings to be eval'ed by your code (please, please do not do that, for the sake of humanity). –  Pointy Jun 3 '11 at 22:56
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Introduce a closure:

var obj = (function(){
    var R = {};

    R.iWantThisHere = 5;

    R.log = function() {
        console.log(R.iWantThisHere);
    }

    return R;
})();

Demo:

> obj.log()
5
> obj.iWantThisHere = 6
> obj.log()
6

This is the most common (dare I say recommended) way to do javascript programming, by creating functions to restrict variables to a scope. It is necessary because javascript does not have block-level scoping.

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If your question is, "How can I stuff a new named value into an alreay-extant scope?", the answer is that you cannot. The closest you can come is:

var obj = (function() {
  var iWantThisHere = "whatever";
  return {
    test: "sure",
    n: function() { var x = iWantThisHere + "yaay I have my special variable"; }
  };
})();

That gives you the "obj" that you have in your original example, plus for any functions defined in that object, you've got access to a "relatively global" variable they all share.

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okay thx, i tried with some hacky function that packed the passed obj, into a json like string, and depacked it into the new scope, but this was not a appropriate solution –  Sep O Sep Jun 3 '11 at 22:39
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Any particular reason to do this the hard way? Why not just add an argument to the function in obj.n?

var obj = { 
  test: "sure", 
  n : function(iWantThisHere){ console.log(iWantThisHere); }
};

obj.n("yeah");

Or even simpler (although scoping gets uglier):

var iWantThisHere = "dance time";
var obj = {
  test: "sure", 
  n : function(){ console.log(iWantThisHere); }
};
obj.n();

Or with a closure, plus some details on how you separate their public and private parts:

var obj = (function() {
  var privateVariable = "i'm private";

  function privilegedMethod() {
  };

  return {
    iWantThisHere: "",
    test: "sure",
    n: function() {
      console.log(this.iWantThisHere);
    },
    publicVariable: "i'm public",
    publicMethod: function() {}
  };
})();

obj.iWantThisHere = "hi";
obj.n(); // logs "hi"
obj.addedMethod = function() { console.log("I've been added"); }
obj.addedMethod(); // logs "I've been added";
console.log(obj.privateVariable); // logs undefined (unavailable outside closure)
console.log(obj.publicVariable); // logs "i'm public"

The other answers cover closure notation pretty well, too. But the bottom line is that closures and restricted scopes would be pointless in JavaScript if you could just go around injecting new variables everywhere.

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I'm not sure if he wants to provide it with something real to log, but that would at least make it log undefined if he called obj.n() with no arguments.. Again not clear on exactly what he wants. –  Robert Jun 3 '11 at 22:37
    
thanks for your closure lesson, but you missed the point –  Sep O Sep Jun 3 '11 at 23:05
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