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What I am trying to do with the following code is have it grab all the database names then loop through those databases check to see if the table tblAdminLogin exists and if it does update the password for username 'foo'

I have been using a select statement instead of an update as of yet until it works properly.

declare @databases table
(
    PK      int IDENTITY(1,1), 
    dbid    int,
    name    varchar(50)
)

insert into @databases(dbid, name) select dbid, name from master.dbo.sysdatabases

Declare @maxPK int; select @maxPK = MAX(PK) from @databases
Declare @pk int; Set @pk = 1
Declare @name varchar(50)

While @pk <= @maxPK
Begin
    Select @name = name from @databases where PK=@pk
    if OBJECT_ID(''+@name+'.dbo.tblAdminLogin') IS NOT NULL
    Begin
        Select password from @name.dbo.tblAdminLogin where username = 'foo'
        --Update @name.dbo.tblAdminLogin Set password='bar' where username = 'foo' 
    End
    Set @pk = @pk + 1
End

The main code in question is

    Select @name = name from @databases where PK=@pk
    if OBJECT_ID(''+@name+'.dbo.tblAdminLogin') IS NOT NULL
    Begin
        Select password from @name.dbo.tblAdminLogin where username = 'foo'
        --Update @name.dbo.tblAdminLogin Set password='bar' where username = 'foo' 
    End

Edit: Added T-SQL to title since I am using SQL Server

Edit: Fixed the Typo .dbl. to the correct .dbo.

share|improve this question
    
I know you selected an answer, but the best way to do this is clearly using sp_msforeachdb. When the api provides a way, it is always a good idea to use it. Check out the answer which show how to use sp_msforeachdb –  Hogan Jun 4 '11 at 13:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Dynamic SQL.

Untested

declare @SQL varchar(max) -- varchar(8000) if on SQL Server 2000 or earlier
While @pk <= @maxPK  
Begin      
    Select @name = name from @databases where PK=@pk
    if OBJECT_ID(''+@name+'.dbo.tblAdminLogin') IS NOT NULL      
    Begin          
        set @SQL = 'update ' + quotename(@name) + '.dbo.tblAdminLogin Set     password=''bar'' where username = ''foo'''
        exec (@SQL)
    End
    set @PK = @PK + 1
End

References:

Edit: general note on types, not asked for by OP:

The database name is of type SYSNAME which, last I checked, is equivelent to a NVARCHAR(128). Storing that value in a VARCHAR type has the chance of losing information. Small chance at some site because of the names they would choose, but a chance none the less.

declare @databases table
(
    PK      int IDENTITY(1,1), 
    dbid    int,
    name    sysname
)

insert into @databases(dbid, name) select dbid, name from master.dbo.sysdatabases

Declare @maxPK int; select @maxPK = MAX(PK) from @databases
Declare @pk int; Set @pk = 1
Declare @name sysname -- so that 

declare @SQL nvarchar(4000) 
While @pk <= @maxPK  

Begin      
    Select @name = name from @databases where PK=@pk
    if OBJECT_ID(@name+N'.dbo.tblAdminLogin') IS NOT NULL      
    Begin          
        set @SQL = N'update ' + quotename(@name) + N'.dbo.tblAdminLogin Set     password=''bar'' where username = ''foo'''
        exec (@SQL)
    End
    set @PK = @PK + 1
End
share|improve this answer
    
Are you certain you have a <dbname>.dbl.tblAdminLogin in one or more databases? I don't have SQL Server handy, looks like it should work, so I'm stymied on why the call to object_id is not working. –  Shannon Severance Jun 3 '11 at 23:43
    
@Shannon I fixed my typo .dbl. to .dbo. and the OBJECT_ID Portion Worked but the set @SQL portion returns the error "The name 'update [dbname].dbo.tblAdminLogin Set password='bar' where username='foo' ' is not a valid identifier." –  Dave M Jun 3 '11 at 23:51
    
@Shannon Yes it is in 40 or so databases. By the way thanks for the tip on sysname –  Dave M Jun 3 '11 at 23:54
    
@Dave M: Needs parens around @SQL on the exec line: exec (@SQL). Will update answer. –  Shannon Severance Jun 4 '11 at 0:01
    
I used to always use exec sp_executesql @SQL but could not remember the reason why. Maybe it is silliness around needing the parens to execute string versus looking for a stored procedure named by the string. –  Shannon Severance Jun 4 '11 at 0:04

Alternative:

EXEC sp_MSForEachDB 
  'Use [?]; if object_id(''tblAdminLogin'') is not null Select password from tblAdminLogin where username = ''foo'''
share|improve this answer

I might do something like this:

exec sp_msforeachdb '
if (object_id(''[?].[dbo].[tblAdminLogin]'', ''U'')) is not null
begin
  update table [?].[dbo].[tblAdminLogin] Set password=''bar'' where username = ''foo''
  select ''?'', username, password from [?].[dbo].[tblAdminLogin] where username = ''foo''
end
'
share|improve this answer

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