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I've realized you can have a property in an object run automatically like this:

var obj = {

    init:(function(){ alert('loaded');})();

}

I'm trying to use this method as an initializer for the object. The problem I'm running into is passing a reference to 'obj' to the init property. I suspect it generates errors because the obj hasn't been completely built in browser yet. I'm trying to do the following, but unsuccessfully. If there's a way to do this, I'd love to know how.

var obj = {
    prop:function(){ alert('This just ran.'); },
    init:(function(){ obj.prop(); })();
}
share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 13 down vote accepted

If you want to create multiple instances of similar objects, you should use plain old constructor functions (remember to put shared properties in the prototype!).

If you want to create a single object, consider using an anonymous constructor. Your example would read:

var obj = new (function() {
    this.prop = function() {
        alert('This just ran.');
    }

    // init code goes here:
    this.prop();
});

This has an additional benefit over object literals: the constructor function can be used as a closure over 'private' variables.

Don't overuse object literals: they may make simple things simple, but complex things will get overly complicated.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Do you know where I can find documentation on these anonymous constructors? –  JW. Jan 19 at 6:57
1  
@JW, I believe an anonymous constructor is just an anonymous function being used as a constructor (i.e. called with the new keyword). See also stackoverflow.com/questions/20057431/… and enfinery.com/30/javascript-the-case-of-an-anonymous-constructor –  iX3 Mar 18 at 19:49

A simple alternative:

var obj = {

  init: function(){ 
    alert('loaded');
  }

}.init();
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Init in jQuery-like style

(function() {

  var $ = function(){
    return new $.fn.init();
  };

  $.fn = $.prototype = {
    init: function(){
      this.prop();
    },
    prop: function(){
      alert('This just ran.');
    }
  };

  $.fn.init.prototype = $.fn;

  $();

})();

jsbin.com

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Yes, obj does not seem to exist locally till later. This worked for me with setTimeout. Tested ok on IE8, FF5, Chrome 12, Opera v11.5. Not sure about the 50 milliseconds though, I imagine it is enough.

var obj = {
    prop: function() { alert('This just ran.') },
    init: ( function(){ setTimeout(function(){obj.prop()},50) } )()
}
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Why don't you use the contructor model (actually, I have no idea of its correct name):

function Obj() {
    // Initialising code goes here:
    alert( 'Loaded!' );

    // ...

    // Private properties/methods:
    var message = 'hello',
        sayHello = function() {
            alert(message);
        };

    // Public properties/methods:
    this.prop = function() {
        sayHello();
    };

    // Encapsulation:
    this.setMessage = function(newMessage) {
        message = newMessage;
    };
}

Usage:

var instance = new Obj();
instance.setMessage('Boo');
instance.prop();
share|improve this answer
    
A reason for not initialising in the constructor is that you need to call the constructor every time you want a prototype (eg. to make a subclass) — function XObj() {...}; XObj.prototype= new Obj();. You don't really want to initialise an actual instance in this case. –  bobince Mar 8 '09 at 13:33

Does it work if you pass "this" into the init function?

something like: (untested)

var obj = {
    prop:function(){ alert('This just ran.'); },
    init:(function(o){ o.prop(); })(this);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Nah. Passing (this) is a reference to window.object –  Geuis Mar 8 '09 at 12:20
1  
Not directly related, but you can quickly prototype and test stuff using jsfiddle.net –  Audrius Nov 18 '10 at 17:05

This is not possible: obj doesn't exist until the whole block is interpreted.

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I think you want to try something like this:

var obj = {
    prop: function() { alert('This just ran.'); },
    init: function() { obj.prop(); }
}

Object literals reqire comma-separated members without semicolons.

share|improve this answer
    
that wont run the init function on creation though –  Andrew Bullock Mar 8 '09 at 12:15
    
You are right - there isn't any way to do that with object literals. –  Andrew Hare Mar 8 '09 at 12:19

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