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Let's say you have a piece of code like:

resource = allocateResource();
try { /* dangerous code here  */ }
finally { free(resource); }

I'm not referring to any specific language here, but I guess Java, C#, and C++ would be good examples (assuming you're using __try/__finally in MSVC++).

Is this exception-safe?

Personally, I don't think this is exception-safe, because what if there's an exception before you enter the try block? Then your resource will leak.

I've seen this enough times, though, that I think it I'm missing something... am I? Or is this really unsafe?


Edit:

I'm not asking about allocateResource throwing an exception, but a situation in which you get an exception after that function has returned, but before resource is assigned.

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1  
Why not move the resource acquisition into the try, then check if it's null before freeing it in the finally? Though the allocation itself would still need to be all-or-nothing exception safe... –  Cameron Jun 4 '11 at 4:59
    
@Cameron: Because you still can't be sure that the exception can't happen before resource is assigned, whether it's inside the block or outside. –  Mehrdad Jun 4 '11 at 5:00
    
Are you worried about a scenario where a custom assignment operator throws an exception? –  Chris Bednarski Jun 4 '11 at 5:09
1  
This could be one of the dumbest questions I have read. If allocateResource is dangerous then put it in the try block, and it is exception safe. –  Nix Jun 4 '11 at 5:09
1  
"a situation in which you get an exception after that function has returned, but before resource is assigned." What exactly do you think can possibly happen, at all, between these two events? Is threading involved or something? –  Karl Knechtel Jun 4 '11 at 6:18

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm not asking about allocateResource throwing an exception, but a situation in which you get an exception after that function has returned, but before resource is assigned.

It gets very messy to try to handle this aspect of exception safety, not least because the language constructs don't allow you to install your finally handler in the middle of an assignment statement.

My rationale for all this is that if you can't get from the end of a function call to assigning to a variable then your system is already hosed. Who cares if you leak memory when you can't assign to a variable?

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+1 it seems like you're one of the few people here who understood my question well and gave a reasonable answer, thanks. :) –  Mehrdad Jun 4 '11 at 5:17
2  
of course, answering after the edit was beneficial! –  David Heffernan Jun 4 '11 at 5:21
    
Yeah, that too. :) –  Mehrdad Jun 4 '11 at 5:22

The point is to have all the code that can throw exception inside the try block. In your case:

try
{
    resource = allocateResource();
    //...
}
finally { free(resource); }

Otherwise - no, of course its not safe.

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@littleadv: But that still doesn't work -- what if there's an exception before resource is actually assigned? –  Mehrdad Jun 4 '11 at 4:59
    
@Mehrdad: Then there's no resource to worry about? –  GManNickG Jun 4 '11 at 5:01
    
@GMan? Huh? The resource is allocated, an exception is thrown, and you can't free it because you don't have access to it, since resource was never fully assigned. Not sure what you mean... –  Mehrdad Jun 4 '11 at 5:02
    
@Mehhrdad: some_type resource = null; try { resource = get(); /* ... */ } finally { free(resource); /* check for null for necessary */ }? Not that it matters, getting it can be done just above the try or first-thing, there's no difference whatsoever. –  GManNickG Jun 4 '11 at 5:06
3  
@Mehrdad: Sure, you can come up with an infinite number of fantastic scenarios where some magical thing happens that ruins everything. But that's not reality. According to these languages, such an assignment is uninterrupted. If the OS throws an exception, you've already left language-land, and asking about language behavior is pointless. –  GManNickG Jun 4 '11 at 5:15

In the case of C# it is considered unsafe, because a ThreadAbortException can be thrown between the resource allocation and the beginning of the try block. For this reason, C#4 changes the expansion of a using block to move the resource allocation inside the try, and the finally block uses a hidden boolean (or tests against null—I can’t remember exactly) to determine whether the allocation actually took place.

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1  
Can you provide a reference for the C#4 using behavior you describe? Disassembly shows otherwise and the documentation contradicts you: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yh598w02.aspx –  Rick Sladkey Jun 4 '11 at 5:36

It depends on how allocateResource is written. Given the snippet above allocateResource can result in two outcomes: 1) It allocates and returns a resource 2) It excepts (and therefore does not return a resource)

So if allocateResource is sure to not leak any allocations internally before throw-ing, the above will not leak resource since that method cannot both throw and return.

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@dkackman: I'm not asking about a situation in which allocateResource throws, but a situation in which there's an exception after it returns. –  Mehrdad Jun 4 '11 at 5:03
    
Oh. Isn't clear from your snippet. Any code outside of the try but after the allocation would indeed leak. The finally block would never be hit. The stack starts unwinding at the point of the exception before the try block is entered. And the finally executes on the exit of the try block not the method. –  dkackman Jun 4 '11 at 5:06
1  
@Mehrdad: You mean between the return and the try block? There is no code between the return and the try block, so no exception. At least none that a finally block could recover from (e.g. an exception could occur if the DLL containing this function was unloaded, but then the finally block is gone too). –  Ben Voigt Jun 4 '11 at 5:06
    
@Ben: No code --> No exception? What about a situation in which the OS throws an exception? (Say, if I press Ctrl-C in a console application, if there's an APC callback, etc.) Why can you assume there's no exception because there's no code? Can't things happen that are beyond your control, which could still throw exceptions at the wrong time? –  Mehrdad Jun 4 '11 at 5:09
2  
@Mehrdad: I just listed two situations when you could have an exception thrown after the function returns and before the variable is assigned, but both are catastrophic anyway. Another way is SetThreadContext -- equally catastrophic (this is how ThreadAbortException is usually implemented, I believe). –  Ben Voigt Jun 4 '11 at 5:15

Only the code inside the try{} block is safe. And only if all the exceptions are catched correctly.

Of course, the code outside the block will not be, and that is exactly the desired behaviour.

Please, note also that the code in the finally{} block can throw exceptions as well, so you might need to include try-catch blocks inside the finally or catch blocks.

e.g.:

try {
    // your code here
} finally {
    try {
        // if the code in finally can throw another exception, you need to catch it inside it
    } catch (Exception e) {
       // probably not much to do besides telling why it failed
    }
} catch (Exception e) {
    try {
        // your error handling routine here
    } catch (Exception e) {
       // probably not much to do besides telling why it failed
    }
}
  • If the exception is thrown before the allocation, then there is nothing to be freed and thus there is nothing to leak.
  • If the exception occurs after the allocation and inside the try/catch block, then it will be handled by finally
  • if the exception can occur after the allocation and before the try/catch block, then the code should be reconsidered and those problematic lines should be moved inside the block.
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I think you are answering your own question. If allocateResource allocates and then throws an exception before resource is assigned to the variable then resource will leak, and there is nothing try/finally block can do about it, because try/finally blocks in most languages (including Java and C#) do not actually know about the resources you use inside them.

So, in order for try/finally to be effective allocateResource has to somehow guarantee to be atomic; either allocate and assign to variable without fail, or not allocate at all and fail. Since there is not such guarantee (especially considering unpredictable thread deaths), then try/finally blocks cannot be effectively safe.

Some languages start to support using or with clauses that know about the resource, and are therefore able to close them safely (although that would depend on the implementation of the interpreter/compiler/runtime, etc.)

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In C#, any managed and unreferenced resource will be garbage collected during the next run, so you have no problem there.

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It's not always practical to make resources tolerant of abandonment. Finalizers can often help, but not always nicely. As a simple example, suppose an IEnumerator<T> holds a lock (not uncommon in iterators). Is there any mechanism by which a Finalize() method could clean things up if the enumerator is abandoned without being Disposed? –  supercat Aug 10 '11 at 17:04

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