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I know that JavaScript return false means prevent default event (like preventDefault() method).

#1

<a href="http://stackoverflow.com" onclick="return false;">click</a>

#2

<a id="a" href="http://stackoverflow.com">click</a>
<script>
document.getElementById('a').addEventListener('click', function(){  return false; }, false);
</script>

I wonder why just #1 prevent default event but not #2. Did I make some mistake?

Edit: Sorry, I missed an id of anchor tag and third argument of code in #2. I added it but it's still not working.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There are two problems with your second example:

  1. You're using document.getElementById but you're giving a tagname. You can probably use document.getElementsByTagName (which returns a NodeList you would then index into), or give the element an id attribute and use getElementById to look it up.

  2. Your addEventListener call is missing the third argument, which is required. So:

    document.getElementById('someId').addEventListener(
        'click',
        function(){  return false; },
        false // <=== Third argument, you almost certainly want `false`
    );
    

Regarding your question about return false: If you're using a browser that supports addEventListener and you're hooking up event handlers with it, no, you don't use return false to prevent the default action. Instead, you use event#preventDefault. (You can also use event#stopPropagation to stop the event bubbling, but DOM0's return false doesn't do that, so that's just an extra bonus.)

document.getElementById('someId').addEventListener(
    'click',
    function(e){
        // Prevent the default action of the link
        e.preventDefault();

        // Stop the event propagating (bubbling) to the parent element
        e.stopPropagation();
    },
    false
);

Also note that there are a lot of people using IE8 and earlier, which do not support addEventListener (instead, they support Microsoft's original attachEvent; but not all versions support preventDefault or stopPropagation).


Somewhat off-topic: As you can see, handling events in a cross-browser way is a hassle. It's one of the many hassles you can avoid by using a decent JavaScript library like jQuery, Prototype, YUI, Closure, or any of several others. They smooth over browser differences and provide lots of helpful utility functionality, so you can focus on what you're actually trying to build (rather than worrying about how IE7 and earlier have a broken version of getElementById).

Examples:

jQuery: jQuery provides a return false feature (although it's different from the DOM0 one you're talking about), and it also ensures that event#preventDefault and event#stopPropagation work regardless of how the underlying browser handles events. So either of these work with jQuery:

// Using return false (which prevents the default AND -- unlike DOM0 stuff -- stops propagation)
$('#someId').click(function() { return false; });

// Using the DOM standard event methods -- even on browsers that don't support them
$('#someId').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    e.stopPropagation();
});

Prototype: Prototype provides the DOM standard event methods (even on browsers that don't support them) as well as event#stop which is just a combination of preventing the default and stopping propagation:

// Using `stop` (which prevents the default and stops propagation)
$('someId').observe('click', function(e) { e.stop(); });

// Using the DOM standard event methods -- even on browsers that don't support them
$('someId').observe('click', function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    e.stopPropagation();
});

Other libraries will offer similar functionality.

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+1 for the third argument of addEventListener, haven't spotted that :) –  kapa Jun 4 '11 at 7:32
    
Even after I added third argument it still doesn't work. I just wonder why it doesn't work. For example in this example if you click the google, the page will be redirected. –  Sangdol Jun 4 '11 at 7:46
1  
@Sangdol: As I said in the answer, if you're using addEventListener, you use event#preventDefault, not return false: jsfiddle.net/APQk6/38 I'll update the answer to make that stronger. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 4 '11 at 7:53
    
@Crowder: Such a great answer. Thanks. –  Sangdol Jun 4 '11 at 8:02
1  
jQuery's return false behaviour is different to return false in a DOM0 event handler, which doesn't stop the event propagating. I'd argue that it's an unhelpful feature, and means that "jQuery makes return false work" is slightly inaccurate. –  Tim Down Jun 4 '11 at 11:15

This will not work w/o a proper id (not tag name)

document.getElementById('a')

Try

<a id="example" href="http://stackoverflow.com">click</a>
...
document.getElementById('example')...
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If you use getElementById(), you need an id on the element. As the name suggests, this function will find an element by searching for the id.

<a id="a" href="http://stackoverflow.com">click</a>
<script>
document.getElementById('a').addEventListener('click', function(){  return false; });
</script>

If you want to find it by tag name, you can use getElementsByTagName(). It will return an array (actually a NodeList) of those tags.

Using:

var x=document.getElementsByTagName('a')[0];

x will store a reference to the first link (a element) on the page.

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you can't get the anchor-tag with document.getElementById(), because it is a TagName and not an Id.

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addition: you can get the first tag by using document.getElementsByTagName('a')[0] but thats just an example. you really shouldn't use this, because if you would add an anchor tag before the one you want to use than this would be the first one. –  mightyplow Jun 4 '11 at 7:31

Maybe u have to add "javascript:" before the "return false". Like so:

<a href="http://stackoverflow.com" onClick="javascript:return false;">click</a>

I hope that helps.

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no, the javascript: scheme makes sense when you use it where you'd use an URL, like in href or in the browser address bar. onclick is already a script. –  Kos Jan 4 '14 at 16:55

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