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I am having problems setting the value of a property in Rhinomocks. I need to set the initial value of the property outside the method under test and then set its value inside the method under test conditionally. Some code:

public interface IResponse
{
    string ResponseText { get; set; }
}

public void ProcessResponse(IResponse response)
{
    if(response.ResponseText == "Unset")
    {
        response.ResponseText = someService.GetResponse();//someService here is irrelvant to the question
    }
}

[TestMethod]
public void ResponseValueIsSetWhenConditionIsTrueTest()
{
    var mock = Mock<IResponse>.GenerateMock();
    mock.Stub(x => x.ResponseText).Returns("Unset");

    Processor.ProcessResponse(mock);

    Assert.AreEqual("Responseval", mock.ResponseText); //Fails because the method doesn't set the value of the property.
}

I need the mock's property to have an initial value going into the Act part of the test, and allow the method under test to change that value so I can assert on it later. However mock.ResponseText is always set to "Unset", and the method never changes its value - what is going on here?

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2 Answers 2

Have you tried PropertyBehavior? For example:

mock.Stub(x => x.ResponseText).PropertyBehavior();

Then in your test:

mock.ResponseText = "Unset";
Processor.ProcessResponse(mock);
Assert.AreEqual("Responseval", mock.ResponseText);
share|improve this answer
    
What does PropertyBehavior() do exactly? –  MalcomTucker Jun 4 '11 at 12:00
    
It tells Rhino.Mocks to emulate a simple property behavior for the property, i.e. you can get and set the property value like any other property of a "normal" object. –  Chaquotay Jun 4 '11 at 13:04

First of all, there's a difference in behavior between mocks and stubs in Rhino.Mocks. Secondly, I'm not sure what version of Rhino.Mocks you are using, but using the latest one and AAA syntax, this certainly works:

public interface IResponse
{
    string ResponseText { get; set; }
}

...

    [Test]
    public void Test()
    {
        IResponse response = MockRepository.GenerateStub<IResponse>();

        response.ResponseText = "value1";
        Assert.AreEqual("value1", response.ResponseText);

        response.ResponseText = "value2";
        Assert.AreEqual("value2", response.ResponseText);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, would you mind explaining what is the difference between a mock and stub in Rhino? –  MalcomTucker Jun 4 '11 at 16:02
    
Stubs are used just for simulating code external to the code you're testing so that you can run your test scenario. Mocks are meant not just for simulating the external code, but also for setting expectations on it and verifying those expectations. Rhino.Mocks author actually announced a while ago that these two types will be merged into a single entity in a new version of the lib, but I don't see anything happening on that front. –  Igor Brejc Jun 4 '11 at 17:52

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