Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I decided to try my own hand at a bit of Substitution Failure Is Not A Error (SFINAE) code to test if the global operator<< is defined for a custom type.

The Stack Overflow question SFINAE + sizeof = detect if expression compiles already addresses testing for operator << through SFINAE, but my code is slightly different and is producing a puzzling result.

Specifically, my test code below won't even compile if I try to define operator<< for my custom type (struct A) after the test_ostr SFINAE template code -- but, from my understanding it should work fine since it's defined before any actual instantiation of the test_ostr class.

OTOH, it will compile if I define a operator<< for a different class that is not even instantiated or defined. But, then the test_ostr code fails to correctly find operator<<.

This code compiles and runs in GCC 4.4.3:

//#define BUG 1 // Uncomment and the program will not compile in GCC 4.4.3
//#define BUG 2 // Uncomment and the program will compile, but produces an incorrect result, claiming operator<< is not defined for A.

#include <iostream>

struct A{};
struct B{};

// If BUG is #defined, the operator<< for struct A will be defined AFTER the test_ostr code
// and if BUG <=1, then GCC 4.4.3 will not compile with the error:
// sfinae_bug.cpp:28: error: template argument 2 is invalid
#ifdef BUG
// if BUG > 1, defining the opertor << for *C*, an un-defined type, will make GCC  magically compile!?
#  if BUG > 1
  struct C;
  std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, const C&);
#  endif
#endif

#ifndef BUG
  std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& ostr, const A&) { return ostr; };
#endif

template<class T>
struct test_ostr
{
  template <class U, std::ostream& (*)(std::ostream&, const U&) >
  struct ostrfn;
  template<class U>
  static short sfinae(ostrfn<U, &operator<< >*);
  template<class U>
  static char  sfinae(...);
  enum { VALUE = sizeof(sfinae<T>(0)) - 1 };
};

#ifdef BUG
  std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& ostr, const A&) { return ostr; };
#endif

int main(void)
{
  std::cout << "std::ostream defined for A: " << int(test_ostr<A>::VALUE) << std::endl;
  std::cout << "std::ostream defined for B: " << int(test_ostr<B>::VALUE) << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

Output showing the bugs:

>c++ sfinae_bug.cpp && ./a.out 
std::ostream defined for A: 1
std::ostream defined for B: 0

>c++ -DBUG sfinae_bug.cpp && ./a.out 
sfinae_bug.cpp:28: error: template argument 2 is invalid

>c++ -DBUG=2 sfinae_bug.cpp && ./a.out 
std::ostream defined for A: 0
std::ostream defined for B: 0

Are these compiler bugs? Am I missing something? Are the results different with a different compiler?

share|improve this question
    
FYI, corresponding results for VS2010 are: 1 0, error, 1 0. – Oliver Charlesworth Jun 4 '11 at 11:21

This is wrong, because operator<< is a non-dependent name. So for the case there is no operator<<, your template is ill-formed, and the compiler is at right to reject it at template definition time.

template<class U>
static short sfinae(ostrfn<U, &operator<< >*);

SFINAE applies when a dependent name turns out to be not declared.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't the operator<< already defined for the built-in types? Why does declaring it for the unused struct C fix the compilation for A? Isn't still a compiler error for BUG=2? – McKay.CPP Jun 4 '11 at 22:46
    
@McKay there is no "operator<<" name declared for built-in types. For built-in types, the << operator is not a actual function. All I can say is that the non-dependent lookup for operator<< in your code considers no function declarations that are only visible when instantiating. So in your code when BUG is defined, then it should either give a compiler error (BUG <= 1) or should answer with 0 (BUG > 1). (assuming that sizeof(short) is 2). – Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 4 '11 at 23:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.