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I am working on a two-way private chat that will work in a full screen game.

This is required to let the user to type into a semi-transparent textbox at the top of the screen even when it doesn't have focus.

Using the following code, I can detect ALL physical keys, but have a tough time with virtual keys.

SHIFT is detected.

2 is detected.

However Shift + 2 are detected both as separate keys (Even though [SHIFT+2] gives @ on my keyboard). IE: The program outputs both SHIFT, and 2, but not what they produce: @.

The problem is, how will I convert to a character depending on the keyboard? For example:

  • On a UK Keyboard, SHIFT+2 will give me " (quotes).
  • On a US keyboard, SHIFT +2 will give me @.

How can I convert to a specific character depending on the keyboard?

Here is the code so far:

static interface User32 extends Library {
    public static User32 INSTANCE = (User32) Native.loadLibrary("User32", User32.class);

    short GetAsyncKeyState(int key);
    short GetKeyState(int key);

    IntByReference GetKeyboardLayout(int dwLayout);
    int MapVirtualKeyExW (int uCode, int nMapType, IntByReference dwhkl);

    boolean GetKeyboardState(byte[] lpKeyState);

    int ToUnicodeEx(int wVirtKey, int wScanCode, byte[] lpKeyState, char[] pwszBuff, int cchBuff, int wFlags, IntByReference dwhkl);

}



public static void main(String[] args)  {   
    long currTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

    while (System.currentTimeMillis() < currTime + 20000)
    {
        for (int key = 1; key < 256; key++)
            {
                if (isKeyPressed(key)) 
                    getKeyType(key);
            }
    }
}



private static boolean isKeyPressed(int key)
{
    return User32.INSTANCE.GetAsyncKeyState(key) == -32767;
}



private static void getKeyType(int key)
{

    boolean isDownShift = (User32.INSTANCE.GetKeyState(VK_SHIFT) & 0x80) == 0x80;
    boolean isDownCapsLock = (User32.INSTANCE.GetKeyState(VK_CAPS)) != 0;


    byte[] keystate = new byte[256];
    User32.INSTANCE.GetKeyboardState(keystate); 


    IntByReference keyblayoutID = User32.INSTANCE.GetKeyboardLayout(0);
    int ScanCode  = User32.INSTANCE.MapVirtualKeyExW(key, MAPVK_VK_TO_VSC, keyblayoutID);






    char[] buff = new char[10];

    int bufflen = buff.length;
    int ret = User32.INSTANCE.ToUnicodeEx(key, ScanCode, keystate, buff, bufflen, 0, keyblayoutID);


    switch (ret)
    {
        case -1: 
            System.out.println("Error");
        break;

        case 0:  // no translation

        break;

        default: 
        System.out.println("output=" + String.valueOf(buff).substring(0, ret));
    }




}

It works fine and outputs the keys pressed, but doesn't work with Shift + combinations. I realize that I could do a "Switch" and change Shift+3 to "£", but this will not work with different keyboards.

share|improve this question
    
I think the problem is the use of GetKeyboardState: from MSDN, sounds like it's essentially equivalent to calling GetKeyState, whereas you want the equivalent for GetAsyncKeyState, since another thread has current input focus. Perhaps try populating keystate manually with GetAsyncKeyState, or using AttachInput? –  BrendanMcK Jun 5 '11 at 20:38
    
One other issue you'll likely have to deal with is that you can't intercept keystrokes using GetAsyncKeyState; the game will still see them. –  BrendanMcK Jun 5 '11 at 20:41
    
No. this code works perfectly, try it out if you want. It detects all the physical keys. My only problem is that I don't know what <SHIFT+COMBINATION> will give me because it's keyboard specific. For instance, on a UK keyboard <SHIFT+2> will give me ["] and on a US keyboard <SHIFT+2> will give me @. The only problem is: When I detect SHIFT+2, what character will I translate it to? I need to find a way to do that. –  David Jun 5 '11 at 21:08
    
AttachInput sounds very promising. I'll give it a try. As for the game intercepting keystrokes, I'll pause it while the user is typing by emulating ESC or something similar. –  David Jun 5 '11 at 22:34
1  
My point is that ToUnicode should work out this shift information for you: but it needs accurate keyboard state information to work - it likely pulls the modifier information from that keyboard table, but since it's being fetched with GetKeyboardState, it does not necessarily reflect actual modifier state, which may be why it's returning unshifted characters. You might want to check if any of the keys corresponding to modifiers are pressed in the keystate array when you expect them to be. –  BrendanMcK Jun 7 '11 at 17:51
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

GetKeyboardState has some issues, but GetAsyncKeyState seem to work just fine.

Here complete working example of Console Application that reads keyboard state from any window. Tested with 2 non en-us keyboard layouts on Windows 7.

Handles everything =) and in particular the SHIFT+ combinations (i.e. SHIFT+3 will be translated into correct character for the current keyboard layout)

P.S. David, thanx to your code example I finaly figured out the correct parameters for MapVirtualKeyExW and ToUnicodeEx functions :)

P.P.S. The code is in C#, but I guess it can be easily ported to Java (since when I read your code I mistakenly assumed it's C# and only much later noticed "JAVA" in the question title )

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace KeyboardInputTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            new KeyboardTestClass().RunTest();
        }
    }

    public class KeyboardTestClass
    {
        public void RunTest()
        {
            while (true)
            {
                string keyString = string.Empty;
                if (ReadKeyboardInput(ref keyString) && keyString.Length > 0)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Pressed: {0}", keyString));
                }
                Thread.Sleep(10);
            }
        }

        public bool ReadKeyboardInput(ref string res)
        {
            var hwnd = WinAPI.GetForegroundWindow();
            var pid = WinAPI.GetWindowThreadProcessId(hwnd, IntPtr.Zero);
            var keyboardLayoutHandle = WinAPI.GetKeyboardLayout(pid);

            foreach (var key in (Keys[])Enum.GetValues(typeof(Keys)))
            {
                if (Keyboard.GetAsyncKeyState(key) == -32767)
                {
                    switch (key)
                    {
                        // handle exceptional cases
                        case Keys.Enter:
                        case Keys.LineFeed:
                            res = string.Empty;
                            return false;
                    }
                    res = ConvertVirtualKeyToUnicode(key, keyboardLayoutHandle, Keyboard.ShiftKey);
                    return true;
                }
            }
            return false;
        }

        public string ConvertVirtualKeyToUnicode(Keys key, IntPtr keyboardLayoutHandle, bool shiftPressed)
        {
            var scanCodeEx = Keyboard.MapVirtualKeyExW(key, VirtualKeyMapType.ToVScanCodeEx, keyboardLayoutHandle);
            if (scanCodeEx > 0)
            {
                byte[] lpKeyState = new byte[256];
                if (shiftPressed)
                {
                    lpKeyState[(int)Keys.ShiftKey] = 0x80;
                    lpKeyState[(int)Keys.LShiftKey] = 0x80;
                }
                var sb = new StringBuilder(5);
                var rc = Keyboard.ToUnicodeEx(key, scanCodeEx, lpKeyState, sb, sb.Capacity, 0, keyboardLayoutHandle);
                if (rc > 0)
                {
                    return sb.ToString();
                }
                else
                {
                    // It's a dead key; let's flush out whats stored in the keyboard state.
                    rc = Keyboard.ToUnicodeEx(key, scanCodeEx, lpKeyState, sb, sb.Capacity, 0, keyboardLayoutHandle);
                    return string.Empty;
                }
            }
            return string.Empty;
        }
    }

    // Win API Imports:
    public enum VirtualKeyMapType : int
    {
        ToChar = 2,
        ToVScanCode = 0,
        ToVScanCodeEx = 4
    }
    public static class Keyboard
    {
        public static bool ShiftKey
        {
            get
            {
                return Convert.ToBoolean((int)GetAsyncKeyState(Keys.ShiftKey) & 32768);
            }
        }

        [DllImport("User32.dll")]
        public static extern short GetAsyncKeyState(Keys vKey);

        [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, EntryPoint = "MapVirtualKeyExW", ExactSpelling = true)]
        public static extern uint MapVirtualKeyExW(Keys uCode, VirtualKeyMapType uMapType, IntPtr dwKeyboardLayoutHandle);

        [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, ExactSpelling = true)]
        public static extern int ToUnicodeEx(Keys wVirtKey, uint wScanCode, byte[] lpKeyState, StringBuilder pwszBuff, int cchBuff, uint wFlags, IntPtr dwKeyboardLayoutHandle);
    }

    public class WinAPI
    {
        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        public static extern IntPtr GetForegroundWindow();

        [DllImport("user32")]
        public static extern int GetWindowThreadProcessId(IntPtr hwnd, IntPtr lpdwProcessId);

        [DllImport("user32")]
        public static extern IntPtr GetKeyboardLayout(int dwLayout);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Eddy_Shterenberg Are you creating the next generation stuxnet? :P Nice code bdw –  David Oct 29 '13 at 8:30
    
Nope :) Just dug up some pretty old code from "To be a keylogger" borrowed from codeproject.com/Articles/18890/… and tried to use it for a kind of a virtual keyboard. Thanx for the educational info - didn't know about the stuxnet :) –  Eddy Shterenberg Oct 29 '13 at 20:08
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Try to use JIntelliType library instead. Its much simplier to use than JNA and it should be able to do SHIFT + key (MOD_SHIFT). The only problem you can have is detecting 3, but thats easy to solve (for example by KeyListener printing code of the key).

share|improve this answer
    
I can easily detect "3" and can also detect "Shift". But how will I know that "Shift + 3" will give me "£" on a specific computer? –  David Jun 5 '11 at 11:02
    
Well, if I understand you, the only problem is that the 3 key can be different on every computer. Virutal key should be the same everywhere, I use int value 52 (atm I dont know which of KeyEvent constants it is). On JIntelliType, you can register a hotkey using the proper MOD and the key (in your case 52) using registerHotkey() method. Than you can configure anything you want to do in the listener (for example use Robot class to print the charyou want to print). –  James Jun 5 '11 at 11:50
    
With JIntelliType, can you detect [Shift + <KEY>] Combinations, such as: !"£$%%^&*()_+{}:@~<>? The "3" key is the same on any computer. The Shift+3 Key is different. –  David Jun 5 '11 at 11:57
    
Yes, JIntelliType allows you to register SHIFT + any key. –  James Jun 5 '11 at 12:29
    
Look at your keyboard. Tell me what character you see right above two. On my computer, SHIFT + 2 is ["]. On my Laptop, Shift+2 is [@]. I -know- when the user presses SHIFT + 2. I -don't know- what Shift + 2 will give me on different computers, if it's a " or a @. That's the problem that I haven't solved yet, JIntelliType or not. –  David Jun 5 '11 at 13:16
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