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If both isset() and empty() generate the exact same ISSET_ISEMPTY_DIM_OBJ opcode, how can the PHP VM tell the difference between the two?

This code:

empty($a['b']);
isset($a['b']);

produces the following opcodes:

ISSET_ISEMPTY_DIM_OBJ $a, b -> TMP_VAR 0
FREE TMP_VAR 0

ISSET_ISEMPTY_DIM_OBJ $a, b -> TMP_VAR 1
FREE TMP_VAR 1

Another test:

if (empty($a['b'])) {
    echo 'abc';
}

if (isset($a['b'])) {
    echo 'abc';
}

This produces:

ISSET_ISEMPTY_DIM_OBJ $a, b -> TMP_VAR 0
JMPZ TMP_VAR 0, &(BC4E00+4)
ECHO abc
JMP &(BC4E00+4)

ISSET_ISEMPTY_DIM_OBJ $a, b -> TMP_VAR 1
JMPZ TMP_VAR 1, &(BC4FE0+8)
ECHO abc
JMP &(BC4FE0+8)
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3  
How come did you get at this level lol –  dynamic Jun 4 '11 at 15:51
    
This could be the result of some optimization. You are not using the return value. Try something more complex like an if (…). –  Gumbo Jun 4 '11 at 15:55
    
@Gumbo, updated question. –  rid Jun 4 '11 at 16:26
    
I also tried var_dump() on the result of both functions to see if somehow isset() now does exactly what empty() does, but no, one result was true, another was false, both with identical opcodes... –  rid Jun 4 '11 at 17:10
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+150

Whatever tool you were using to create that opcode dump, it only told you half the truth: It forgot to mention that PHP is passing a constant to that opcode depending on which language construct was used. Those constants are ZEND_ISEMPTY for empty and ZEND_ISSET for isset.

You can find the invocations here and here. (And here the type is put into the extended_value of the opcode.)

If you look at the full opcodes, you'll see those constants as 1 (ZEND_ISSET = (1<<0)) and 2 (ZEND_ISEMPTY = (1<<1)) in the ext column.

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Sounds very plausible. –  GolezTrol Jun 17 '11 at 22:16
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How did you get those opcodes?

I ran your code snippet using "Bytekit", and got the following output:

Function:           main
Number of oplines:  5
Compiled variables: !0 = $a

  line  #     opcode                           result  operands
  -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  3     0     ISEMPTY_DIM_OBJ                  ~0      !0, 'b'
        1     FREE                                     ~0
  4     2     ISSET_DIM_OBJ                    ~1      !0, 'b'
        3     FREE                                     ~1
  6     4     RETURN                                   1

So, in this case, there is a difference in opcodes. Only thing is, I cannot seem to find 'my' opcodes on the official PHP website. This kind of puzzles me, because bytekit has proven to be an excellent tool so far.

I'll look into that, but in the meantime, I thought, you might find my current output of any value.

By the way, I am PHP running 5.3.3 on Ubuntu.

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It must be because of the PHP version. I'm using PHP 5.3.4. –  rid Jun 4 '11 at 16:20
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