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I just want to sum the digits of a BigInt. I can do

scala> "1 2 3".split(" ").map(_.toInt).sum
res23: Int = 6

So I tried

scala> BigInt(123).toString().map(_.toInt).sum
res24: Int = 150

This doesn't work because it maps the characters to their Unicode values.

Both the following work, but is there a more elegant way than using the Java static method or an extra toString conversion?

BigInt(123).toString().map(Character.getNumericValue(_)).sum
BigInt(123).toString().map(_.toString.toInt).sum

(I've also done it using a recursive function, sidestepping strings altogether, but I'm interested here in a concise 1-liner.)

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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Wow... these answers are all over the place! Here, do this:

BigInt(123).toString().map(_.asDigit).sum
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Nice to see another way. It's the same in terms of performance and conciseness as BigInt(123).toString().map(_.getNumericValue).sum (well, the name is a bit shorter), and seems to do the same thing. –  Luigi Plinge Jun 6 '11 at 22:09
    
@Luigi The fastest way is probably map(_ - '0'). –  Daniel C. Sobral Jun 6 '11 at 23:03
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How about not using Strings at all?

def sumDigits(b:BigInt):BigInt = {
  if (b < 10) b else b%10 + sumDigits(b/10)
}
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+1: Definitely preferable in real world, though it may be the "recursive function, sidestepping strings altogether" mentioned in the question. –  Don Roby Jun 4 '11 at 18:00
    
the OP also says he is interested in a "concise 1-liner", indicating that his "recursive function, sidestepping strings altogether" wasn't as concise. –  Kim Stebel Jun 4 '11 at 18:03
    
Thanks, yep I'd got something similar already, but nice to know that this is the real-world way to go! –  Luigi Plinge Jun 4 '11 at 20:50
    
This, it turns out, is a horrible answer in disguise! (I initially though it looked good.) It is not tail recursive and uses O(N^2) memory where N is the number of binary digits! If you avoid this horrible fate by making it tail recursive, it still takes an order of magnitude longer than .toString. –  Rex Kerr Jun 4 '11 at 21:18
    
@Rex Kerr: Interesting point, and you're right... I guess I shouldn't prefer this in the real world as previously noted! I'll leave my upvote though. –  Don Roby Jun 4 '11 at 21:32
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This is not short, and certainly not efficient, but it is another way to go:

scala> Iterator.iterate(BigInt(123))(_/10).takeWhile(_>0).map(_%10).sum
res1: scala.math.BigInt = 6

(and you probably want an Int, which is faster anyway but requires .map(i=>(i%10).toInt).)

The problem with this method (and straightforward recursion) is that you have to compute as many divisions as digits. (You could use /% to speed things up by a factor of 2, but that's still a problem.) Converting to a string is much faster because all those explicit BigInt creations can be avoided.

If you actually want something that works fast (not what you asked for, I know), you need a divide-and-conquer approach:

def fastDigitSum(b: BigInt): Int = {
  val bits = b.bitLength
  if (bits < 63) math.abs(b.toLong).toString.map(_-'0').sum
  else {
    val many = 256
    val zeros = math.ceil(bits*0.150515).toInt // constant is 0.5*log(2)/log(10)
    val root = (
      if (zeros<many) BigInt("1" + "0"*zeros)
      else {
        Iterator.iterate((BigInt("1"+"0"*many),many))(x => (x._1 * x._1, 2*x._2)).
          find(_._2 > zeros/2).get._1
      }
    )
    val (q,r) = b /% root
    fastDigitSum(q) + fastDigitSum(r)
  }
}

Edit: If you want really fast conversions at all sizes, I've modified my scheme as follows. There are some not-entirely-functional bits due largely to a lack of a takeTo method. This should be faster than everything else at all sizes (though it asymptotes to fastDigitSum performance for very large BigInts).

Probably will run better on 64 bit machines than 32.

No strings were harmed in the making of this function.

object DigitSum {
  val memend = BigInt(10000000000000000L) :: BigInt(100000000) :: Nil

  def longSum(l: Long, sum: Int = 0): Int = {
    if (l==0) sum else longSum(l/10, sum + (l%10).toInt)
  }

  def bigSum(b: BigInt, memo: List[BigInt] = Nil): Int = {
    val bits = b.bitLength
    if (bits < 64) longSum(b.toLong)
    else {
      val mem = (
        if (memo.isEmpty) {
          val it = Iterator.iterate(memend.head)(x=>x*x).drop(1)
          var xs = memend
          while (xs.head.bitLength*4 <= bits) xs = it.next :: xs
          xs
        }
        else memo.dropWhile(_.bitLength > bits/2)
      )
      val (q,r) = b /% mem.head
      bigSum(q,memo) + bigSum(r,memo)
    }
  }
}

(Okay--this is ending up sort of like code golf at this point.)

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+1 for interesting technique –  Luigi Plinge Jun 4 '11 at 20:56
    
I did a benchmark - see post below –  Luigi Plinge Jun 4 '11 at 23:36
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I don't think it's much better than the ones you've already got, but

BigInt(123).toString().split("").tail.map(_.toInt).sum

also works.

Also

BigInt(123).toString().map(_.toInt - '0'.toInt).sum

and per Rex Kerr's comment, this can be simplified to

BigInt(123).toString().map(_-'0').sum
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You've got it--the .toInts are unnecessary since all math converts to integers. You just need map(_ - '0')! –  Rex Kerr Jun 4 '11 at 21:02
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I just noticed that the RichChar class has a getNumericValue method, so the answer would be

BigInt(123).toString().map(_.getNumericValue).sum
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This is actually longer than .toString.toInt. This doesn't sound like a very good answer unless you wanted something that you didn't specify. Roby's got the shortest answer (with my suggestion). –  Rex Kerr Jun 4 '11 at 21:07
    
@Rex I'm not too worried about how many letters there are in a method name - for me conciseness means fewer operations –  Luigi Plinge Jun 4 '11 at 22:10
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This in not an answer to the question but a speed test of the suggestions. I ran the tests several times to ensure the VM was warmed up and results were consistent: these results are representative and are for 10000 iterations. See code for definitions of what these methods are.

For 10-digit BigInts

fastDigitSum: 0.020618047 seconds
stringSum:    0.023708908 seconds
stringSum2:   0.02940999 seconds
stringSum3:   0.021641507 seconds
division:     0.052856631 seconds

For 50-digit BigInts

fastDigitSum: 0.183630732 seconds
stringSum:    0.110235062 seconds
stringSum2:   0.134900857 seconds
stringSum3:   0.096670394 seconds
division:     0.317359989 seconds

For 100-digit BigInts

fastDigitSum: 0.427543476 seconds
stringSum:    0.228062302 seconds
stringSum2:   0.277711389 seconds
stringSum3:   0.20127497 seconds
division:     0.811950252 seconds

For 100,000-digit BigInts (1 iteration)

fastDigitSum: 0.581872856 seconds
stringSum:    2.642719635 seconds
stringSum2:   2.629824347 seconds
stringSum3:   2.61327453 seconds
division:     30.089482042 seconds

So it seems BigInt(123).toString().map(_-'0').sum is the winner for speed and conciseness for smaller BigInts, but Rex Kerr's method is good if your BigInts are huge.

Benchmark code:

object Benchmark extends App{
  def fastDigitSum(b: BigInt): Int = {
    val bits = b.bitLength
    if (bits < 63) math.abs(b.toLong).toString.map(_-'0').sum
    else {
      val many = 256
      val zeros = math.ceil(bits*0.150515).toInt // constant is 0.5*log(2)/log(10)
      val root = (
        if (zeros<many) BigInt("1" + "0"*zeros)
        else {
          Iterator.iterate((BigInt("1"+"0"*many),many))(x => (x._1 * x._1, 2*x._2)).
            find(_._2 > zeros/2).get._1
        }
      )
      val (q,r) = b /% root
      fastDigitSum(q) + fastDigitSum(r)
    }
  }

  def stringSum(b: BigInt) = b.toString.map(_.getNumericValue).sum
  def stringSum2(b: BigInt) = b.toString.map(_.toString.toInt).sum
  def stringSum3(b: BigInt) = b.toString.map(_ - '0').sum

  def division(b: BigInt) = sumDig(b, 0)
  def sumDig(b: BigInt, sum: Int):Int = {
    if (b == 0) sum
    else sumDig(b / 10, sum + (b % 10).toInt)
  }

  def testMethod(f: BigInt => Int):Double = {
    val b = BigInt("12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890")
    val b2 = BigInt("1234567890")
    val b3 = BigInt("1234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890")
    val t0 = System.nanoTime()
    var i = 0
    while(i < 10000){
      f(b3)
      i += 1
    }
    (System.nanoTime().toDouble - t0)/1e9
  }

  def runTest(){
    var i = 0
    while (i < 5) {
      println("fastDigitSum: " + testMethod ({fastDigitSum}) + " seconds")
      println("stringSum:    " + testMethod ({stringSum}) + " seconds")
      println("stringSum2:   " + testMethod ({stringSum2}) + " seconds")
      println("stringSum3:   " + testMethod ({stringSum3}) + " seconds")
      println("division:     " + testMethod ({division}) + " seconds")
      i += 1
    }
  }

  runTest()
}
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Why don't you try a BigInt with 100,000 digits? (Just one run is enough to time, you don't need to do it 10k times.) –  Rex Kerr Jun 5 '11 at 0:39
    
@Rex - indeed, then your method wins. I have updated the results. –  Luigi Plinge Jun 5 '11 at 0:58
    
My method wins for more sizes on my machine, but anyway, I've updated it so it should win everywhere all the time :) –  Rex Kerr Jun 5 '11 at 4:03
    
@Rex yep, your new version is 2-3 times faster than anything else, definitely the way to go if speed is the prime consideration. Congrats! –  Luigi Plinge Jun 6 '11 at 22:14
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