Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I "want" to use switch, but i can't seem to get it to work when I use it in this fashion. Anyone know why?

var mystring='my name is johnny';  
switch (!-1) {  
          case mystring.indexOf('hello'):  
        alert('hello');  
        break;  
    case mystring.indexOf('goodbye'):  
        alert('goodbye');  
        break;  
    case mystring.indexOf('johnny'):  
        alert('johnny');  
        break;  
    default:  
        alert('default');           
}  

it always alerts "default", but you can see that I want it to alert "johnny"

share|improve this question
1  
If you want to use indexOf in a 'switch'; the best you can do is chain a bunch of if and else if(s) –  Kevin Jun 4 '11 at 17:54

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Disclaimer: This switch is evil. Use if/else-if statements. but if you must use a switch it can be done as such:

switch (true) {  
    case /hello/.test(mystring):  
        alert('hello');  
        break;  
    case /goodbye/.test(mystring):  
        alert('goodbye');  
        break;  
    case /johnny/.test(mystring):  
        alert('johnny');  
        break;  
    default:  
        alert('default');           
}  

Should work as you want it to.

.test.

I would be tempted to refactor it further.

function Parse(str) {
    var logic = {
        "hello": function(str) { alert("hello"); }
        /*, ... */
    }

    for (var k in logic) {
        if ((new RegExp(k)).test(str)) {
            logic[k](str);
        }
    }
}

Parse("Hello I am johnny");
share|improve this answer
    
the first worked, i will use that one. thank you. the second looks like it works also, but harder to read. the problem i have had has been reading my code. –  Chester Copperpot Jun 4 '11 at 18:08
    
This is a really bastardized switch statement. It can be done so much more clearly and succinctly using if/else if (though I do understand that you're simply demonstrating how to do it with a switch). –  Matt Ball Jun 4 '11 at 18:25
1  
@MattBall your right I should put a disclaimer up –  Raynos Jun 4 '11 at 18:39
    
Read this amazing article and avoid switch-case syndrome - james.padolsey.com/javascript/how-to-avoid-switch-case-syndrome –  Israel G. May 31 '13 at 11:48

!-1 coerces -1 to a boolean, and then negates it, so

switch(!-1)
{
    // stuff
}

is equivalent to

switch(false)
{
    // stuff
}

Since there is no case false, the default will always be executed. This is really not the right way to use a switch — there is no point in switching on a constant expression.

Why do you "want" to use a switch?


Here's how to implement it correctly:

var mystring='my name is johnny';

if (mystring.indexOf('hello') !== -1) alert('hello');
else if (mystring.indexOf('goodbye') !== -1) alert('goodbye');
else if (mystring.indexOf('johnny') !== -1) alert('johnny');

Or, less repetetively,

var mystring='my name is johnny',
    words = ['hello', 'goodbye', 'johnny'],
    word;

while (word = words.shift(), mystring.indexOf(word) === -1);

word = word || 'default';
alert(word);
share|improve this answer
    
He knows that if it is not found it returns -1. So he's trying to switch on the one that returns 0 or more. Except the negation of -1 returns a boolean so that doesn't help. There is some (perverse) logic in this. The best solution would be to switch on a real boolean and replace indexOf with a regular expression .test statement. –  Raynos Jun 4 '11 at 17:54
1  
@Chester please don't tell me you're using indexOf to parse HTML. You should be using the DOM. –  Matt Ball Jun 4 '11 at 18:03
2  
@ChesterCopperpot create anew DOMFragment with the HTML. var fragment = document.createDocumentFragment();fragment.innerHTML = html; –  Raynos Jun 4 '11 at 18:19
1  
@Chester, are you using jQuery? If so: say the HTML string returned from the ajax call is stored in a variable named html (just like in Raynos' comment). Then $(html) returns a jQuery object which contains the parsed input HTML tree. –  Matt Ball Jun 4 '11 at 18:37
1  
@Chester yes you can, but not quite like that. Try var mydiv = $(html).find('#div_id'); –  Matt Ball Jun 4 '11 at 19:06

Your combination of "not"(!) and "-1" seems faulty. You need to move them to your cases like this

var mystring='my name is johnny';  
switch (true) {  
          case mystring.indexOf('hello') != -1:  
        alert('hello');  
        break;  
    case mystring.indexOf('goodbye') != -1:  
        alert('goodbye');  
        break;  
    case mystring.indexOf('johnny') != -1:  
        alert('johnny');  
        break;  
    default:  
        alert('default');           
}

It's a pain in PHP that strpos(...) returns false when not found and 0 when string starts with it (and those 2 values are ==, but not ===) but I personally find JavaScripts indexOf(..) == -1 even worse. (Why can't it be false or null?)

share|improve this answer
    
PHP is open source -> rewrite the relevant extension –  Itay Moav -Malimovka Jun 4 '11 at 18:02
    
    
@Matt Ball I am aware of this thread...it was partly a cynical response and partly a sad one, as it seems I'll have to do something on those lines... (besides, I am not one of the maintainers) –  Itay Moav -Malimovka Jun 4 '11 at 18:10

What's happening here is you're switching the result of !-1 and that case isn't found. switch-case doesn't seem to be the right construct to use here.

share|improve this answer

The expression !-1 will just evaluate to false.

You are trying to convert a comparison like x != -1 into x == !-1, but the ! operator doesn't negate the comparison, only the value.

share|improve this answer
    
condition evaluates, Always, to a value (boolean) –  Itay Moav -Malimovka Jun 4 '11 at 17:57

I don't think your implementation is correct. The proper conditional statement to use is if... else.

var mystring='my name is johnny';

if(mystring.indexOf('hello') != -1) alert('hello');
else if(mystring.indexOf('goodbye') != -1) alert('goodbye');
else if(mystring.indexOf('johnny') != -1) alert('johnny');
else alert('default');

share|improve this answer

The switch should be mystring, example:

http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_switch.asp

share|improve this answer
2  
-1 For w3schools reference. W3Schools is not a reliable source of information. Follow the campaign. The MDN would be a far better resource for switch –  Raynos Jun 4 '11 at 17:53
    
@Raynos: Who to contact when you find an error in that page? –  Guffa Jun 4 '11 at 18:17
    
@Guffa you can log into the MDC page and edit/fix the error yourself. For errors in the w3schools page you can email them, I doubt they will fix them (There are plenty of other errors they don't fix) –  Raynos Jun 4 '11 at 18:38
    
@Raynos: No, the campaign page. –  Guffa Jun 4 '11 at 19:04
    
@Guffa the w3fools page has a list of `FROM:" right at the top with a bunch of twitter accounts. tweet one of them to get in touch. –  Raynos Jun 4 '11 at 19:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.