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Why write <script type=“text/javascript”> when the mime type is set by the server?

I read Dive into HTML5 a while back, and read its semantics chapter again just recently. I noted it advises not to use type="..." attributes on script and style, because:

  • The MIME type should be sent by the server,
  • JS and CSS are the defaults,
  • Browsers don't care.

However, I see it is still common practice to include type attributes (or, horror, language) on both script and style tags. Assuming the server is properly configured to send the correct MIME types, are there reasons for using these other than being explicit?

EDIT: This is explicitly about HTML5, not XHTML.

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marked as duplicate by U2744 SNOWFLAKE, DOK, bernie, Félix Saparelli, robertc Jun 4 '11 at 21:09

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There are some well-written answers on the dup question. –  DOK Jun 4 '11 at 19:58
    
Yeah I saw it right after posting this one, sorry. –  Félix Saparelli Jun 4 '11 at 19:58
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Not a dupe - this is HTML 5 specific. –  Oded Jun 4 '11 at 20:00
    
Thanks Oded. I'll leave it here then. –  Félix Saparelli Jun 4 '11 at 20:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Most people are used to HTML 4/XHTML and before, where the type attribute is required for these elements.

In regards to HTML 5, these are indeed optional and the spec gives a default, depending on the element.

For the script tag, this defaults to text/javascript:

If the language is not that described by "text/javascript", then the type attribute must be present

For the style tag, this defaults to text/css:

The default value for the type attribute, which is used if the attribute is absent, is "text/css".

So, not needed, as you stated. However, browser support and server setups can't always be relied on - being explicit is a good idea as it avoids such problems.

And of course, not all browsers out there support HTML 5 - those that don't will use an earlier version where the attribute is required and your javascript/css might not get parsed in such browsers, meaning you end up with no CSS or javascript on older browsers, when a simple solution for backwards compatibility is to add the attribute.

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+1 It might be interesting to note how non-HTML5 browsers will treat <!DOCTYPE HTML>, which may "lean usage" in one way or another. –  user166390 Jun 4 '11 at 20:05
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@pst <!DOCTYPE html> was chosen specifically because of how non-HTML5 browsers treat it. –  robertc Jun 4 '11 at 21:11
    
@robert Exactly :-) that is one cannot force a browser to understand HTML5 -- only hint that HTML5 should be used for an HTML5-aware browser. –  user166390 Jun 4 '11 at 22:00
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@pst An HTML5 aware browser will use HTML5 parsing no matter what you have as a DOCTYPE except for exactly one quirk, the DOCTYPE was only retained so as to trigger Standards Mode for CSS (ie. it is mostly irrelevant for HTML5) –  robertc Jun 4 '11 at 23:02

The type attribute may not be required for HTML5 but it is required for other HTML Doc Types such as HTML 4.01 Strict. I'd also say that anything making the code/document clearer for the developer is really only ever a good thing.

If that means being explicit about the type of script being used or the type of style, I'd use it.

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1  
It is not required for HTML 5. –  Oded Jun 4 '11 at 20:00
    
I've edited my answer to make this clearer. Thanks Oded. –  Jamie Dixon Jun 4 '11 at 20:02
    
+1 (I've only seen the update, which seems okay, even if not terrific.) A non-HTML5 browser will happily treat <!DOCTYPE HTML> as HTML 4. –  user166390 Jun 4 '11 at 20:04

If you dont use the type it will not validate

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It is not required for HTML 5. –  Oded Jun 4 '11 at 20:01
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"Assuming the server is properly configured to send the correct MIME types, are there reasons for using these other than being explicit?" the question was not directed to html5. the question is why are OTHER reasons people use the type tag. and i answered with the exact reason I use a type tag. i dont apprecate the -1 –  Chester Copperpot Jun 4 '11 at 20:01
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Actually, the question referred to a book on HTML5, so it was implicitly directed it at HTML5. I now made it explicit. –  Félix Saparelli Jun 4 '11 at 20:05

That's not good. In XHTML, the type attribute is strictly required. Although browsers may be lenient, that's no reason to break convention.

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4  
It is not required for HTML 5. –  Oded Jun 4 '11 at 20:00
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@Oded: And few browsers support HTML5. IE3-8, currently the most popular browsers on the market, have zero support. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jun 4 '11 at 20:01
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The question is not asking about XHTML, but HTML 5. –  Oded Jun 4 '11 at 20:02
    
+1 because HTML 5 is most definitely not XHMTL; while this doesn't address it in relation to HTML 5 (which would make a far better answer) it points out that omitting such tags is only valid on some markups (namely HTML 5, but not [necessarily] HTML 4.01 or XHTML, etc). HTML 5 is due in ... 2021? ;-) –  user166390 Jun 4 '11 at 20:02
    
@pst HTML5 is entering last call, and the W3C is targeting a 2014 release –  robertc Jun 4 '11 at 21:13

The type attribute is indeed not required for HTML5, but including it doesn't break validation, so you can convert to HTML5 from either HTML 4 or XHTML 1, and still have your <script> and <style> tags validate.

<link> tags also do not need a type attribute (emphasis added):

The type attribute gives the MIME type of the linked resource. It is purely advisory. The value must be a valid MIME type.

For external resource links, the type attribute is used as a hint to user agents so that they can avoid fetching resources they do not support. If the attribute is present, then the user agent must assume that the resource is of the given type (even if that is not a valid MIME type, e.g. the empty string). If the attribute is omitted, but the external resource link type has a default type defined, then the user agent must assume that the resource is of that type. If the UA does not support the given MIME type for the given link relationship, then the UA should not obtain the resource; if the UA does support the given MIME type for the given link relationship, then the UA should obtain the resource at the appropriate time as specified for the external resource link's particular type. If the attribute is omitted, and the external resource link type does not have a default type defined, but the user agent would obtain the resource if the type was known and supported, then the user agent should obtain the resource under the assumption that it will be supported.

User agents must not consider the type attribute authoritative — upon fetching the resource, user agents must not use the type attribute to determine its actual type. Only the actual type (as defined in the next paragraph) is used to determine whether to apply the resource, not the aforementioned assumed type.

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According to w3 this is required.

Even if new browsers can manage without specifying the tag (by using a default) it is still better to leave it in for backwards compatibility with older browsers.

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It is not required for HTML 5. –  Oded Jun 4 '11 at 20:01
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Quoting the book in question: "This works in all browsers." –  Félix Saparelli Jun 4 '11 at 20:06
    
The link is for HTML4 ^^ "REC-html40". The HTML5 drafts should yield a different conclusion. –  user166390 Jun 4 '11 at 20:07

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