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I get a java.lang.NullPointerException in my Class Article in line 5.

In one class I create the object Article article = new Article(), then I call article.addPrice(quantity, price); with quantity being an Integer with the value '1' and price being a Float with the value '1.32'.

1: public class Article {
2:  private List prices;
3:  public void addPrice(Integer quantity, Float qtyPrice){
4:      Price price = new Price(quantity, qtyPrice);
5:      this.prices.add(price);
6:  }
7: }
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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

you need to initialize the prices list.

prices = new ArrayList<Price>();
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Is there a reason to use an ArrayList instead of a List? Or is me trying to add an object to a List the reason why I cannot instantiate prices = new List<Price>()? –  Jack Murphy Jun 4 '11 at 21:01
2  
List is an interface, ArrayList is a type of list. –  Steven Benitez Jun 4 '11 at 21:03
    
exactly, in Java List is an interface, unlike in C# –  Peter Perháč Jun 4 '11 at 21:06
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Your code never assigns prices, therefore the field still contains its initial value, which is null.

In plain english, you program would read: Create a new price object and add it to the list I assigned to prices. You didn't assign a list, and therefore the computer can't know which list to add to ...

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very well explained :-) –  Peter Perháč Jun 4 '11 at 21:07
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The 'prices' list is not initialized which causes the null reference.

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How can it be fixed? This should be a comment if you aren't going to provide an answer. –  Sam Jun 5 '11 at 1:05
    
It's not clear whether OP simply wanted to know why the exception was thrown, or also wanted to know how to fix it. If the former, this is a full answer, if the latter, it is a partial one - but it is an answer in either case. –  meriton Jun 5 '11 at 18:03
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public class Article
{
 private List<Price> prices = new ArrayList<Price>();

 public void addPrice( Integer quantity, Float qtyPrice )
 {
  Price price = new Price( quantity, qtyPrice );
  prices.add( price );
 }
}

Unless you vastly oversimplified the problem, I can't think of any reason the above would not work.

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great answer, is there a reason why you instantiate the list directly rather than in a constructor? –  Jack Murphy Jun 4 '11 at 21:12
    
Instantiating the list in this manner is exactly the same as in a constructor. This means the list will be initialized in the synthesized constructor. You will see this in the debugger as <clinit> –  Sam Jun 4 '11 at 22:44
    
Exactly what Sam said. You did not mention a constructor in your initial question and I did not want to make any assumptions. Members initialized in this way will also be instantiated regardless of which constructor is called (if there is more than one) -- with collections, I've always viewed that as important. –  Mike M Jun 5 '11 at 15:04
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You have not initialized the private list variable. Insert this as the first lines in addPrice:

if (prices == null) {
    prices = new ArrayList<Price>();
}

This will ensure the prices list is initialized prior to being accessed.

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1  
new List<Float>() ??? –  unbeli Jun 4 '11 at 20:57
    
cannot instantiate the type List<Price> –  Jack Murphy Jun 4 '11 at 21:04
1  
Yes, List is the generic interface. You need to instantiate a list that is appropriate to your code. ArrayList is a good start if you are not sure what you need. –  Sam Jun 4 '11 at 21:05
    
perfect, is there a reason why you suggested if instead of a constructor? –  Jack Murphy Jun 4 '11 at 21:09
    
Simply lazy loading. If the article class will always require this array list to be initialized, you should most certainly move it to a constructor. –  Sam Jun 4 '11 at 21:11
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In your code, you have just declared the list prices and not initialized it.

Use following corrected code :

1:  public class Article {
2:  private List<Price> prices = new ArrayList<Price>();
3:  public void addPrice(Integer quantity, Float qtyPrice){
4:      Price price = new Price(quantity, qtyPrice);
5:      this.prices.add(price);
6:  }
7: }

so till the time you do new ArrayList(), you have null in prices and you are trying to invoke .add(price) on null in line 5, hence the NullPointerException.

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