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Let's assume I create the following two strings at runtime (from user input for example):

public void someMethod(String input) {

   if ( input == null ) return;

   String a = input + input;
   String b = input;

   ...

}

Is Java (and its compiler) smart enough to detect at runtime that b is contained in a and therefore it is not necessary to allocate memory for b? b could just point at a with half the length?

In other words, does Java implement a dynamic version of String.intern()?

EDIT

Considering answers made so far, my example should be:

public void someMethod(String input) {

   if ( input == null ) return;

   String a = input + input + input;
   String b = input + input;

   ...

}
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're not actually creating two strings in your example: b is just a reference to input. So, to do what you're asking, Java would have to somehow go back and alter old strings when a new string is created (such as by saying input + input).

To answer your broader question, AFAIK the only way for two strings to be sharing memory (besides, as you mention, being intern()'d) is for one or both to have been created using substring(). So if you really wanted to save on memory, you could do this:

String a = input + input;
String b = a.substring(input.length());

(To be clear, this will only save memory if the value of b is being stored somewhere but input is discarded and winds up garbage-collected.)

EDIT

New and improved example for new and improved question:

String a = input + input + input;
String b = a.substring(2 * input.length());

(Note that this will always save memory over the second example in the question, since we've avoided an allocation altogether. So the previous caveat doesn't apply.)

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No, this won't happen, because the String passed in as an argument already exists, and Strings are immutable. The double-length one has to be created separately, since the original array won't have room for more characters.

In the reverse case, though -- where you start out with the long string, and use substring() to create a shorter one -- the two strings will, indeed, share the same char array.

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1  
At risk of being pedantic (what else is SO for? :-) ), the JVM could theoretically be messing around with the internal representation of a String at runtime, so long as it still acted immutable, but AFAIK none do this. (Except I think the result of hashCode() is cached, at least by Sun. But that's ancillary to the actual storage of the character data.) –  Luke Maurer Jun 5 '11 at 0:30
1  
@Luke: that's absolutely true, it could, and doing so would reduce eventual memory use. But it wouldn't reduce peak memory use -- you'd still have to have both arrays in memory at some point -- and it wouldn't reduce the number of allocations, because nothing is going to let you avoid creating that second array. But you could arrange things so that at the end, you could GC the smaller array, if you really, really wanted to -- that is, of course, unless some previous operation of this sort had led to that array already being shared... –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jun 5 '11 at 0:36
    
Oh, certainly, that way madness lies … and that's why no-one does it :-) Besides the difficulty of it, it seems to me it's unlikely that the compiler can help nearly as much as the programmer can simply by judicious use of substring() and intern() where necessary. –  Luke Maurer Jun 5 '11 at 0:38
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As others have pointed out, b just points to the same string as input.

As for a, we can use javap to disassemble your code:

public static void someMethod(java.lang.String);
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   ifnonnull   5
   4:   return
   5:   new #4; //class java/lang/StringBuilder
   8:   dup
   9:   invokespecial   #5; //Method java/lang/StringBuilder."<init>":()V
   12:  aload_0
   13:  invokevirtual   #6; //Method java/lang/StringBuilder.append:(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
   16:  aload_0
   17:  invokevirtual   #6; //Method java/lang/StringBuilder.append:(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
   20:  invokevirtual   #7; //Method java/lang/StringBuilder.toString:()Ljava/lang/String;
   23:  astore_1
   24:  aload_0
   25:  astore_2
   26:  return

The compiler uses StringBuilder.append() to perform the concatenation, which (in Sun/OpenJDK, at least) just copies everything into a big char array - no intern()ing here. Same applies with your edit - the input string is appended 5 times in total.

I can imagine an alternate implementation of String(Builder|Buffer) could be written to maintain a chain of arrays, which would allow better reuse and efficiency in some cases.

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If you used that argument we could trivially show that "java" doesn't inline functions, does no CSE or pretty anything else. Does javac not do any interesting optimizations? Yes. Does that mean that the JIT doesn't optimize lots of things - and I think it does a bit interning strings at runtime (don't nail me on that though and the situation above hardly is the best example) - no. –  Voo Jun 5 '11 at 14:05
    
Nothing I said precludes runtime optimisations. But Hotspot initially interprets bytecode as-is until it determines that a method is called frequently enough in some context that inlining, JIT compilation, etc. is worthwhile - so the code analysed above will be executed at least initially. –  SimonJ Jun 5 '11 at 16:20
    
Fair point though, in that "java" is a somewhat woolly term. Perhaps I should've been clearer that the compiler isn't the be-all-and-end-all of Java optimisation, although it's the only part we can reason about with confidence. –  SimonJ Jun 5 '11 at 16:23
    
Yes if you formulated it that way I'd agree. Iirc the Hotspot VM does some String inlining at runtime, but I agree making definite statements about JIT optimized functions is not easy and can change from one VM to another (today not really a problem any longer) or even from version to version (although I'd hope they wouldn't remove features without a good reason). –  Voo Jun 5 '11 at 18:43
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Nop, the compiler is intelligent enough to detect String concatenation at compile time, for instance:

       String a = "hello, " + "world";
       //Will become
       String a = "hello, world";

But substring matching is a bit much to do every time you create a string. However Java tries to avoid multiple string creation (if two strings are equal), you should check String.intern()

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