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I'm new to programming so I'm sorry in phrasing if I'm not asking this question correctly.

I have the following code:

int sum = 100;
int a1 = 20;
int a2 = 5;
int a3 = 10;
for (int i = 0; i * a1 <= sum; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; i * a1 + j * a2 <= sum; j++) {
        for (int k = 0; i * a1 + j * a2 + k * a3 <= sum; k++) {
            if (i * a1 + j * a2 + k * a3 == sum) {
                System.out.println(i + "," + j + "," + k);
            }
        }
    }   
}

basically what it does is tell me the different combinations of a1, a2, and a3 that equal the above sum (in this case 100). This works fine but I'm trying to apply it to a larger dataset now and I'm not sure how to do without manually programming the for loops or knowing in advanced how many variables I'll have(could be anywhere from 10 to 6000). I basically have a sql query that loads that data from an array.

Is there a way in Java OR python (I'm learning both) to automatically create nested for and if loops?

Thanks so much in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
sounds suspiciously like you should be doing some of this work in your SQL query... –  Mitch Wheat Jun 5 '11 at 3:10
    
"automatically create nested loops"... you mean recursion? –  JBernardo Jun 5 '11 at 3:17
1  
Yep, do what Mitch says and you likely won't have to deal directly with 6000 variables. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 5 '11 at 3:18
    
I'm not sure if that works for me..because once I create this I need to analyze each result. I used SQL to pull the array of data down, but not sure how it'll help me for this(what I am doing is called Diophantine equation) because all the values in the array are being analyzed in a recursion(thanks JBernardo). –  Lostsoul Jun 5 '11 at 3:24
1  
Sounds like global warming, and N ?= NP. In your example, all sums contain multiples of 5 (10=2*5, 20=4*5), so you could divide 100 by 5 which is 20, and then only combine some of the fives to tens and to 20ies. And you could avoid the inner if (which isn't a loop, btw.) and instead change the inner most loop, to substract ia1 + ja2 from sum, and just check, if this is divisible by a3, but this will not help you much with 6000 variables. :) –  user unknown Jun 5 '11 at 3:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Recursion.

This is what it sounds like you are trying to solve:

your current example: 20x1 + 5x2 + 10x3 = 100

so in general you are doing: A1x1 + A2x2 + ... + Anxn = SUM

so you pass in an array of constants {A1, A2, ..., An} and you want to solve for {x1, x2, ..., xn}

    public void findVariables(int[] constants, int sum, 
                              int[] variables, int n, int result) {
        if (n == constants.length) { //your end condition for the recursion
            if (result == sum) {
                printArrayAsList(variables);
            }
        } else if (result <= sum){ //keep going
            for (int i = 0; result + constants[n]*i <= sum; i++) {
                variables[n] = i;
                findVariables(constants, sum, variables, n+1, result+constants[n]*i);
            }
        }
    }

and to call for your example you'd use:

    findVariables(new int[] {20, 5, 20}, 100, new int[] {0,0,0}, 0, 0)
share|improve this answer
    
I've tested it and fixed the bugs. :-) –  ShreevatsaR Jun 5 '11 at 4:36
    
@ShreevatsaR: thanks for that :) –  monty Jun 5 '11 at 4:37
    
BTW you don't really need result: you can just pass around sum-constants[n]*i in each call (sum now denotes the remaining sum to be achieved), and test when it becomes 0. Also, don't need a condition on the else: you're guaranteed because of the for-loop check that result doesn't become greater than sum (or that sum doesn't become negative, if you do away with result). That will be one less argument to your function. I didn't want to make such a sweeping change to your code, though. –  ShreevatsaR Jun 5 '11 at 4:43
    
+1 for cleverness, though I think having this method private and another public method with only two arguments (constants, sum) which would call the private one would be better. –  Yanick Rochon Jun 5 '11 at 4:44
    
awesome thank you so much Monty..I was having a small problem though I couldn't get printArrayAsList to work(I looked it up and didn't find any references to it..) is it a costume command or do I need to import something to get it to work? –  Lostsoul Jun 5 '11 at 23:32

Although it may not scale, here's a really simple brute-force python solution that doesn't require recursion:

import itertools
target_sum = 100
a = 20
b = 5
c = 10
a_range = range(0, target_sum + 1, a)
b_range = range(0, target_sum + 1, b)
c_range = range(0, target_sum + 1, c)
for i, j, k in itertools.product(a_range, b_range, c_range):
    if i + j + k == 100:
        print i, ',', j, ',', k

Also, there are ways to compute the cartesian product of an arbitrary list of lists without recursion. (lol = list of lists)

def product_gen(*lol):
    indices = [0] * len(lol)
    index_limits = [len(l) - 1 for l in lol]
    while indices < index_limits:
        yield [l[i] for l, i in zip(lol, indices)]
        for n, index in enumerate(indices):
            index += 1
            if index > index_limits[n]:
                indices[n] = 0
            else:
                indices[n] = index
                break
    yield [l[i] for l, i in zip(lol, indices)]

If you're just learning python, then you might not be familiar with the yield statement or the zip function; in that case, the below code will be clearer.

def product(*lol):
    indices = [0] * len(lol)
    index_limits = [len(l) - 1 for l in lol]
    index_accumulator = []
    while indices < index_limits:
        index_accumulator.append([lol[i][indices[i]] for i in range(len(lol))])
        for n, index in enumerate(indices):
            index += 1
            if index > index_limits[n]:
                indices[n] = 0
            else:
                indices[n] = index
                break
    index_accumulator.append([lol[i][indices[i]] for i in range(len(lol))])
    return index_accumulator

You did a smart thing in your code by skipping those values for which i + j + k is greater than sum. None of these do that. But it's possible to modify the second two to do that, with some loss of generality.

share|improve this answer

With Java, some generic simplistic implementation would require at least two classes :

Some delegate to pass to the recursive algorithm, so you can receive updates wherever the execution is at. Something like :

public interface IDelegate {
   public void found(List<CombinationFinder.FoundElement> nstack);
}

The for implementation, something like :

public class CombinationFinder {
   private CombinationFinder next;
   private int multiplier;

   public CombinationFinder(int multiplier) {
      this(multiplier, null);
   }
   public CombinationFinder(int multiplier, CombinationFinder next) {
      this.multiplier = multiplier;
      this.next = next;
   }

   public void setNext(CombinationFinder next) {
      this.next = next;
   }

   public CombinationFinder getNext() {
      return next;
   }

   public void search(int max, IDelegate d) {
      Stack<FoundElement> stack = new Stack<FoundElement>();
      this.search(0, max, stack, d);
   }

   private void search(int start, int max, Stack<FoundElement> s, IDelegate d) {
      for (int i=0, val; (val = start + (i*multiplier)) <= max; i++) {
         s.push(i);
         if (null != next) {
            next.search(val, max, s, d);
         } else if (val == max) {
            d.found(s);
         } 
         s.pop();
      }
   } 

   static public class FoundElement {
      private int value;
      private int multiplier;
      public FoundElement(int value, int multiplier) {
         this.value = value;
         this.multiplier = multiplier;
      }
      public int getValue() {
         return value;
      }
      public int getMultiplier() {
         return multiplier;
      }
      public String toString() {
         return value+"*"+multiplier;
      }
   }
}

And finally, to setup and run (test) :

CombinationFinder a1 = new CombinationFinder(20);
CombinationFinder a2 = new CombinationFinder(5);
CombinationFinder a3 = new CombinationFinder(10);

a1.setNext(a2);
a2.setNext(a3);

a1.search(100, new IDelegate() {
   int count = 1;
   @Override
   public void found(List<CombinationFinder.FoundElement> nstack) {
      System.out.print("#" + (count++) + " Found : ");
      for (int i=0; i<nstack.size(); i++) {
         if (i>0) System.out.print(" + ");
            System.out.print(nstack.get(i));
         }
         System.out.println();
      }
   }
});

Will output 36 solutions.

With this concept, you can have as many inner loops as you want, and even customize each one if you want through inheritance. You can even reuse objects (ie: a1.setNext(a1);) with no problem at all.

** UPDATE **

Simply because I like monty's solution, I couldn't resist into testing it, and here's the result, tweaked a little.

DISCLAIMER all credits goes to monty for the algorithm

public class PolynomialSolver {

   private SolverResult delegate;
   private int min = 0;
   private int max = Integer.MAX_VALUE;

   public PolynomialSolver(SolverResult delegate) {
      this.delegate = delegate;
   }

   public SolverResult getDelegate() {
      return delegate;
   }

   public int getMax() {
      return max;
   }

   public int getMin() {
      return min;
   }

   public void setRange(int min, int max) {
      this.min = min;
      this.max = max;
   }

   public void solve(int[] constants, int total) {
      solveImpl(constants, new int[constants.length], total, 0, 0);
   }

   private void solveImpl(int[] c, int[] v, int t, int n, int r) {
      if (n == c.length) { //your end condition for the recursion
         if (r == t) {
            delegate.solution(c, v, t);
         }
      } else if (r <= t){ //keep going
         for (int i=min, j; (i<=max) && ((j=r+c[n]*i)<=t); i++) {
            v[n] = i;
            solveImpl(c, v, t, n+1, j);
         }
      }
   }

   static public interface SolverResult {
      public void solution(int[] constants, int[] variables, int total);
   }

   static public void main(String...args) {

      PolynomialSolver solver = new PolynomialSolver(new SolverResult() {
         int count = 1;
         @Override
         public void solution(int[] constants, int[] variables, int total) {
            System.out.print("#"+(count++)+" Found : ");
            for (int i=0, len=constants.length; i<len; i++) {
               if (i>0) System.out.print(" + ");
               System.out.print(constants[i]+"*"+variables[i]);
            }
            System.out.println(" = " + total);
         }
      });

      // test some constants = total
      solver.setRange(-10, 20);
      solver.solve(new int[] {20, 5, 10}, 100); // will output 162 solutions

   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks ShreevatsaR, I had a bug in my ìf statement. I fixed it, plus put the conditions on the other way around, so the results show the entire "formula", including 0's –  Yanick Rochon Jun 5 '11 at 4:38
    
thanks for the answer Yanick. I tested your code, but I was having trouble tweaking it a bit..instead of int I wanted to include decimals also, but it keeps erroneous sys type when I turn everything to float, it seems to be asking for doubles..I'm going to keep plugging away but any suggestions would be great. –  Lostsoul Jun 6 '11 at 1:53
    
@Lostsoul, in Java, a value like 0.4 is double by default. Just like 5 is int. To have a short, you need to cast it. To have a float, you can either cast it, or use the 0.5f notation. –  Yanick Rochon Jun 6 '11 at 3:20
    
I didn't know that Yanick..I always thought float was decimals. I'll cast all the ints and doubles and see how it goes..thanks for clearing that up. –  Lostsoul Jun 6 '11 at 3:23
    
@Lostsoul, also, when working with floating values, you need to take into account that 0.1f * 0.1f = 0.010000001f and 0.1d * 0.1d = 0.010000000000000002, therefore you can't just compare your equation result with an equality sign (==) but rather, you need to compare if the result's difference is within an epsilon value (read en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machine_epsilon), or an error tolerance value. –  Yanick Rochon Jun 6 '11 at 3:30

There may be a way to put the variables into a List and use recursion to eliminate all of the loops. However, the running time of this brute force approach grows exponentially with the number of variables. (i.e. the algorithm may not complete in our lifetimes for numbers of variables in the thousands).

There are some articles on how to solve Diophantine equations more efficiently. Number theory is not my area of expertise, but hopefully these will be of assistance.

http://www.wikihow.com/Solve-a-Linear-Diophantine-Equation

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Btreat for taking the time to answer. The link you posted seems to only use 2 variables, I can do it with 3 and more but my problem is I'm manually creating the loops, I want to somehow automate the brute force attempt to solve Diophantine equations. (also no worries about the lack of number theory expertise..I'm a total newbie and learning number theory as well as programming :-) –  Lostsoul Jun 5 '11 at 3:47
    
The problem is that there's really nothing much you can do for the Diophantine equation a_1 + a_2 + ... = k. There are no coefficients, no number-theoretic properties that assist, etc. –  ShreevatsaR Jun 5 '11 at 3:48
    
@ShreevatsaR you are correct. I believe solving that Diophantine equation is mathematically / computationally equivalent to finding all the prime factors to a large number. If I'm not mistaken, much of cryptography relies on the inability to do that efficiently. –  btreat Jun 5 '11 at 3:57
    
Oh, but when the numbers are small it's ok. You can factor n in O(√n) time etc. So as long as n < 10^15 or so, factorising is very fast. I also hadn't noticed the coefficients before. –  ShreevatsaR Jun 5 '11 at 4:07

Based on @monty's solution but with a few tweaks. The last constant can be determined by division.

public static void findVariables(int[] constants, int sum) {
    findVariables0(constants, sum, new int[constants.length], 0);
}

private static void findVariables0(int[] constants, int remaining, int[] variables, int n) {
    if(n == constants.length - 1) {
        // solution if the remaining is divisible by the last constant.
        if (remaining % constants[n] == 0) {
            variables[n] = remaining/constants[n];
            System.out.println(Arrays.toString(variables));
        }
    } else {
        for (int i = 0, limit = remaining/constants[n]; i <= limit; i++) {
            variables[n] = i;
            findVariables0(constants, remaining - i * constants[n], variables, n+1);
        }
    }
}

public static void main(String... args) {
    findVariables(new int[] { 5,3,2 }, 100);
}

When I changed int to double I wouldn't use float for 99% of cases due to the rounding error you get is not worth the memory you save.

public static void findVariables(double[] constants, double sum) {
    findVariables0(constants, sum, new double[constants.length], 0);
}

private static void findVariables0(double[] constants, double remaining, double[] variables, int n) {
    if(n == constants.length - 1) {
        // solution if the remaining is divisible by the last constant.
        if (remaining % constants[n] == 0) {
            variables[n] = remaining/constants[n];
            System.out.println(Arrays.toString(variables));
        }
    } else {
        for (int i = 0, limit = (int) (remaining/constants[n]); i <= limit; i++) {
            variables[n] = i;
            findVariables0(constants, remaining - i * constants[n], variables, n+1);
        }
    }
}

public static void main(String... args) {
    findVariables(new double[]{5.5, 3, 2}, 100);
}

This compiles and runs fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Peter, I compiled your code and tested it, it worked great..but I wanted to try to get decimals as well and converted all the int to floats but am getting this error: Uncompilable source code - possible loss of precision required: float found: double –  Lostsoul Jun 6 '11 at 2:53
    
when I change it to float, the results show decimals but when I change the findVariables to includ decimals in the constants or sum, i get the above error –  Lostsoul Jun 6 '11 at 2:54
    
I am guess you haven't used the cast correctly?? When I converted the code it compiled and ran fine. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 6 '11 at 7:59
    
Thanks very much Peter..I fixed it..I'm new to java and was using float when I thought I needed decimals..didn't know it was double that I actually needed..it works perfectly now..thanks a million! –  Lostsoul Jun 6 '11 at 12:51

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