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I like to scope all of my JQuery functions and event sinks to $(window).load, like this:

$(window).load(function ()
{
   function Foo(id)
   {
      alert(String.format("Do Foo for: {0}", id));
   }
});

Normally, I do all my work at this scope, but I have a case where I'd like to call Foo(27) from an HREF built by a standalone JQuery widget. The HREF looks like this:

<a href="javascript:Foo(27)">Click me!</a>

However, the Foo() function isn't found when I click on the link. How can I make it so?

[EDIT]

So, I just accepted an answer below and wanted to share my final implementation. Foo() has been replaced with the name of actual method I'm using. And yes, I know that String.format() doesn't exist natively; it's part of my own base library. With that in mind, here's what I've got. This is from the file where I define all of my global namespaces. This definition exists outside the jQuery scope.

// This is defined in the global namespace
if (typeof (window.App) === "undefined")
{
   window.App = {};
}

Here's the line from the jQuery widget that builds the HREF. The title is for a prediction, and the HREF navigates to the details page for that prediction:

r = String.format('<a href="javascript:App.NavDetails({1});" class="link3">{0}</a>',
   Predikt.General.EncodeHtml(options.rowData.Title), 
   options.rowData.PredictionId);

And here's the actual implementation of the NavDetails function in my $(window).load()-scoped jQuery file:

$(window).load(function ()
{
   App.NavDetails = function (id)
   {
      // Do something interesting with the ID here...
      alert(String.format("The ID is: {0}", id));
   };
});
share|improve this question
    
there is no String.format in javascript. and also please elaborate on what you would like to pass to Foo on load? –  naveen Jun 5 '11 at 5:29
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can do this

$(window).load(function (){
    window.Foo =  function(n){
      alert(n);
   }
});

http://jsfiddle.net/JQn8H/

Or this

var Foo;

$(window).load(function (){
    Foo =  function (n){
      alert(n);
   }
});

http://jsfiddle.net/JQn8H/2/

IMO, a better approach would be to set a namespace for your app, so you don't pollute the gobal namespace

window.App = {};

$(window).load(function (){
   App.Foo =  function (n){
      alert(n);
   }
});

Then, in your html you would call it:

<a href="javascript:App.Foo(27)">Click me!</a>

http://jsfiddle.net/JQn8H/3/

But, you might want to consider calling it from your script and not from the markup.

share|improve this answer
    
But how do I call this from the HREF? –  Armchair Bronco Jun 5 '11 at 5:24
    
You are doing it inline, check the fiddle I posted <a href="javascript:Foo(27)">Click me!</a> –  jaime Jun 5 '11 at 5:26
    
Technically, you don't need to do var Foo at all if Foo is intended to be global. I prefer your first method, as it is more explicit. –  MooGoo Jun 5 '11 at 5:30
    
Nice! I think we have a winner here! I also prefer the first version. Haven't used jsfiddle.net before, so I didn't click on your link initially. Thought it was a link to some documentation. I'll wait a bit before accepting this answer, but so far this is exactly what I was looking for. It basically turns my original question on its head. Instead of decorating the call from the HREF, you're telling the function in $(window).load() to look for a function called from the global scope. Very clever. –  Armchair Bronco Jun 5 '11 at 5:36
    
I like your edited version with window.App. When I write my own jQuery widgets and controls, I always scope them to their own namespace, so I guess I might as well do the same things for Javascript that would otherwise be living in the global namespace. Thanks again for all these great suggestions and for the link to jsfiddle (destined to become one of my favorite programming related websites based on the little I've seen so far). –  Armchair Bronco Jun 5 '11 at 5:49
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Foo needs to be declared outside of the anonymous function:

function Foo(id) {....}

$(window).load(function(){
  ....
});
share|improve this answer
    
As I noted above, I can't have it at the global scope. I need to access other support functions and variables that are already scoped to $(window).load. –  Armchair Bronco Jun 5 '11 at 5:21
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You have to choose between doing work at that scope and having a function accessible like that. The only other alternative is to force a reload or to bind it to the anchor's click handler.

Also, you might have changed prototype, but unless you have, String.format doesn't work. You probably just want to do "Do Foo for: " + id

function Foo(id) {
  alert("Do Foo for: " + id);
}
$(window).load( ... );

or

<a class="someClass" data-id="23">Click me!</a>

...

$(window).load(function() {
  $("a.someClass").click(function() {
    alert("Do Foo for: " + $(this).data("id"));
  });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Yep, unless someone comes alone with a better solution, this is what I'm already doing. In general, I try to avoid using expando attributes when alternatives exist. In this case, I was hoping to just pass in the ID as a parameter to Foo(). But since I can't do this, I'll add the ID as an expando, add a shared CSS class to the anchor, sink click events on that CSS class, and then extract the expando ID value. –  Armchair Bronco Jun 5 '11 at 5:23
    
BTW: Re String.format -- this is already part of another library I have and am so dependent upon that I can no longer write code that does archaic string concatenations! :-) String.format() with replaceable parameters is one of my favorites features from this library. –  Armchair Bronco Jun 5 '11 at 5:26
    
I have the same reluctant attitude toward data attributes (trying to find a solution that stays inside JS), although they've come in handy. It was especially true when I was internationalizing a Chrome extension (replacing all the text in tags with data-i18n="someString"). You can use separate static HTML pages, but that's painful. As for String.format, I love it in the many languages where it's native, I just wanted to make sure you weren't some Java/C# guy with the same expectations of JS on its own. ;) –  brymck Jun 5 '11 at 5:33
    
I am a C# guy, and when I started working with jQuery about 18 months ago, one of the first things I looked for was a high-performant version of String.format(). Turns out there are LOTS and LOTS of implementations out there; some are optimized for shorter strings, others are optimized longer strings or dozens of parameters. I finally settled on something that was a jack of all trades but master of none. –  Armchair Bronco Jun 5 '11 at 5:44
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Either move the Foo function outside your $(window).load() function or bind Foo to your <a> element inside the loading function. You can't get inside your $(window).load() callback from the outside.


From your comments it looks like you need Foo to stay inside your $(window).load() anonymous function as it needs to access other things in that scope. You can work around this by moving a reference to Foo outside the anonymous function. This variant of jm-'s approach:

$(window).load(function() {
    //...
    function Foo() {
        //...
    }
    //...
    window.Foo = Foo;
});

This leaves a reference to Foo in the window object and since window is the default scope, you should be able to access it in your <a> element.

share|improve this answer
    
Darn. I was hoping that I could decorate the call to Foo from the HREF somehow (like <a href="$.Foo(27)">Click me!</a> or something) to make Foo() visible. I can't move Foo() into the global space because there are variable and support functions in $(window).load that I need to access. So I guess I'll just have to store the ID in an expando attribute when I build the anchor tag, and then sink the click event using conventional jQuery syntax. This can then call Foo() and pass in $(this), and then from Foo() I can look at the expando to get the ID. –  Armchair Bronco Jun 5 '11 at 5:15
    
@Armchair: You could keep Foo where it is (so it has access to everything in its current scope) and then set up an alias for it that is visible outside, sort of a variant of jm-'s approach. –  mu is too short Jun 5 '11 at 5:23
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