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Sometimes while I'm debugging an exception will be raised.

For example, consider this code:

def some_function():  # Pretend this function is in a library...
    # ...and deep within the library is an exception:
    raise Exception('An exception message with valuable information.')

import pdb; pdb.set_trace()
try:
    some_function()  # Pretend I am debugging from this point using pdb.
except:
    pass

While debugging from the some_function() call, if I issue a next command I will see the following details about the exception that was raised [and caught]:

Exception: Exceptio...ation.',)

Here's a straight copy / paste from the terminal I was working in:

> /tmp/test.py(7)<module>()
-> some_function()  # Pretend I am debugging from this point using pdb.
(Pdb) next
Exception: Exceptio...ation.',)
> /tmp/test.py(7)<module>()
-> some_function()  # Pretend I am debugging from this point using pdb.
(Pdb) 

It would be useful to see the entire exception message. How can I do this in pdb?

share|improve this question
    
What version of Python are you using? Mine doesn't truncate like that. – Keith Jun 5 '11 at 8:46
    
Version 2.7.1. Note that the raise statement is printed in it's entirety, so at first glance you might thing the whole exception is printed, but when the actual Exception is "intercepted" (I don't know the term) by pdb, it is truncated. – Buttons840 Jun 5 '11 at 17:43
    
Well, I actually wrote my own variation of a Python debugger that doesn't do that, and also means to enter the debugger automatically (uses sys.excepthook). If you like you can try that instead. It's the debugger subpackage. – Keith Jun 6 '11 at 1:44
up vote 9 down vote accepted
+100

pdb stores the exception type and value in __exception__. You can print the exception part of a traceback in pdb with:

import traceback; print "".join(traceback.format_exception_only(*__exception__))

For example:

> /tmp/test.py(7)<module>()
-> some_function()  # Pretend I am debugging from this point using pdb.
(Pdb) next
Exception: Exceptio...ation.',)
> /tmp/test.py(7)<module>()
-> some_function()  # Pretend I am debugging from this point using pdb.
(Pdb) import traceback; print "".join(traceback.format_exception_only(*__exception__))
Exception: An exception message with valuable information.

(Pdb) 

Unfortunately this does not include the rest of the traceback, but all that information is available through the where command of pdb anyway. If you really want the full traceback, you can add the following to your ~/.pdbrc file or paste it into your terminal:

!global __currentframe, __stack; from inspect import currentframe as __currentframe, stack as __stack
!global __format_exception_only, __print_stack; from traceback import format_exception_only as __format_exception_only, print_stack as __print_stack
!global __Pdb; from pdb import Pdb as __Pdb

# find the last frame on the stack with an object named "pdb" or "self" that is a pdb.Pdb object
# works for pdb called the usual way, or pdb.pm(), or pdb.set_trace()
!global __pdb; __pdb = [__framerec[0].f_locals.get("pdb") or __framerec[0].f_locals.get("self") for __framerec in __stack() if (__framerec[0].f_locals.get("pdb") or __framerec[0].f_locals.get("self")).__class__ == __Pdb][-1]

alias traceback __print_stack(__pdb.stack[-1][0]); print "".join(__format_exception_only(*__exception__))

Then you can just use the new traceback alias to get what you want:

> /tmp/test.py(7)<module>()
-> some_function()  # Pretend I am debugging from this point using pdb.
(Pdb) next
Exception: Exceptio...ation.',)
> /tmp/test.py(7)<module>()
-> some_function()  # Pretend I am debugging from this point using pdb.
(Pdb) traceback
  File "test.py", line 7, in <module>
    some_function()  # Pretend I am debugging from this point using pdb.
  File "test.py", line 3, in some_function
    raise Exception('An exception message with valuable information.')
Exception: An exception message with valuable information.

(Pdb) 

Warning: all of this relies on undocumented pdb and bdb internals and is likely to break.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the extremely useful hack. It's disappointing that there's no normal way to do something so common and so useful. This hack works also with pdb++ , so I'm switch to that over ipdb. – SpaghettiCat Nov 4 '15 at 11:42

The python debugger doesn't "break on exception" - which can be quite frustrating if you're used to that functionality. As such, I adopt a policy of logging strack traces and working back from there.

import logging
try:
    raise Exception('An exception message with valuable information.')
except:
    logging.exception('Error in test code')

If you use a good IDE (such as Eclipse with pydev), the log entries for the stacktrace are made into hyperlinks that jump straight to the appropriate position in code.

You can dump a stack trace at any point in your code by importing traceback

import traceback
trace = traceback.format_exc()
share|improve this answer
1  
It's better to use logging.exception('Informative message') which logs the exception traceback, and also any information about the operation which failed (the 'informative message', which can have arguments etc.). You can log at any level (e.g. DEBUG) using logging.debug(..., exc_info=True). – Vinay Sajip Jun 5 '11 at 8:36
    
I was not aware of that - thanks Vinay. I'll update my answer if that's ok by you? – Steve Mayne Jun 5 '11 at 8:48
    
I'm using twisted.python.log. I could use logging, but I'd rather not. Furthermore, the try: raise; except: ... is not in my code but somewhere in twisted, (at least I think so). So if I'm going to use logging like that I'll have to modify the twisted code. – Buttons840 Jun 5 '11 at 17:45
    
The Python debugger does break on exception. Use python -m pdb followed by your script filename. What I usually do instead is run python -i or set the PYTHONINSPECT environment variable and then use import pdb; pdb.pm() upon an exception. – Michael Hoffman Apr 6 '15 at 20:04

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