Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Quick question: If I have a very large function/sub in a class that is an instance method (i.e., not Shared), do I gain or lose anything by moving that to a shared method and then declaring a small stub method for the instance use?

I.e., I go from this:

Public Sub MyBigMethod(ByVal Foobar As String)
    If String.IsNullOrWhitespace(Foobar) Then
        Throw New ArgumentNullException("Foobar")
    End If

    ' Lots and lots of ugly code.
    ' Really.  There is lots of ugly code here.
    '
    ' Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing
    ' elit. Aliquam vel erat sit amet massa ultricies
    ' adipiscing. Mauris eu est ligula, a pharetra lorem.
End Sub



To This:

Private Shared Sub MyBigMethod(ByVal Obj as MyObj, ByVal Foobar As String)
    ' Lots and lots of ugly code.
    ' Really.  There is lots of ugly code here.
    '
    ' Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing
    ' elit. Aliquam vel erat sit amet massa ultricies
    ' adipiscing. Mauris eu est ligula, a pharetra lorem.
End Sub

Public Sub MyBigMethod(ByVal Foobar As String)
    If String.IsNullOrWhitespace(Foobar) Then
        Throw New ArgumentNullException("Foobar")
    End If

    Call MyClass.MyBigMethod(Me, Foobar)
End Sub

My thinking is I save on memory size per each instance of the object. Because each instance only has to lug around the stub method which handles calling the shared version and passing an instance of itself to the shared method so that it can do whatever it needs to do. But I'll wager that I sacrifice a very teensy amount of speed because of the added function call overhead.

Correct?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My thinking is I save on memory size per each instance of the object.

This is incorrect, because each instance does not store the method in memory. Instance methods are only stored in memory once. Function instructions are different than class members (which are stored per instance).

Furthermore, you gain a bit of a penalty by adding a function call, because the state of the stub method must be saved when calling the shared method. Then, it has to be loaded back when the shared method terminates. (Note: This is the same penalty you take when making any non-inline function call; the penalty becomes more stiff as the quantity and size of parameters increase)

You went down a logical line of thinking, but it was based upon the assumption that each instance gets its own logic instructions -- when they are actually used across all instances of a class.

share|improve this answer
    
Sounds a bit like how an interrupt handler works at the CPU level. It just save the state of the thread it just interrupted, then restores them before returning. So if my assumption is wrong, then nothing is gained whatsoever by making a large function a shared method? –  Kumba Jun 5 '11 at 6:06
    
@hamlin11: Re, third paragraph: What's the benefit then of a shared method on a class? Only for cases where one deals with utility methods that do not need to operate directly on the instance variables of a class? –  Kumba Jun 5 '11 at 6:09
1  
You actually gain some thread-safety problems with shared methods. As far as the CPU is concerned, there is no difference between shared and instance methods. It's just assembly language instructions. The compiler determines who gets access to those instructions before committing the program to assembly. –  George W Bush Jun 5 '11 at 6:11
    
@hamlin11: I haven't had a need for threads yet. But that is actually on my short list to tinker around with. I suppose part of my mixup comes from how C uses static methods (from a kernel perspective). –  Kumba Jun 5 '11 at 6:14
1  
Most of the time, you just need to think about shared/static members or functions in terms of "What do I need to do?". Does it apply to one object, or is it something that is at the class level? For example -- in a Product Class, the Save() function should be an instance function. However, Product.ReturnAllProducts() should be a shared function since it applies to all products. Some people use instance members / functions to track collective object information, such as ProductCountInMemory which could be incremented/decremented in constructors/destructors –  George W Bush Jun 5 '11 at 6:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.