Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

So, I was just wondering if there was anyway to import the entire Java Framework all at once without having to include the entire list at the header of my file. Or if there's a file I can write which compiles it all together.

Unless, this is "java.lang", perhaps? I doubt that's the universal though. I also would like to know the best method of importing the JDK framework (which I downloaded) into the Eclipse IDE, if that's possible, and how it will pertain to my code.

I've been screwing with this for hours, now, and am confused -__-;

Thanks for any tips on this.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use a shortcut of * for package imports. For instance:

import java.util.*;

IDEs such as Eclipse make it easy to manage imports, however. In Eclipse, for instance, you can press ctrl+shift+O and it will search for any imports for you. (Or command+shift+O on the Mac.) Let the tools do the annoying work.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome. Thanks to both of you - great help. This language seems to be more interesting than C# (imo) for some reason. – zeboidlund Jun 5 '11 at 7:26
1  
You're welcome. Consider accepting one of our answers, too, please. =) – Marvo Jun 5 '11 at 8:21
    
Done and done. Sorry - totally new to this thing. – zeboidlund Jun 7 '11 at 5:07
    
A lot of us are -- that's why we want the "accepts". =) Welcome, and good luck. – Marvo Jun 7 '11 at 16:46

to import the entire Java Framework all at once without having to include the entire list at the header of my file.

No, you'll have to import each package you need separately. The most concise thing you can do is to use the * wild card, i.e., import java.util.*;

The reason is basically that your code would easily become ambiguous if you could import an entire API. Packages are a way of restricting name spaces. Importing them all together would sort of obstruct it's purpose.

I also would like to know the best method of importing the JDK framework (which I downloaded) into the Eclipse IDE

To include the jar-file in the project you right click on the jar-file and choose Add to build path.

If you want to import the classes used in your Java code automatically, you can do Source -> Organize Imports.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, essentially anyone which reads your code would need a lot of time to understand where to find the package (and therefore the documentation) of some given class you are using in the code. This would make the code unmanageable. – ignis Jun 5 '11 at 6:22
    
For example, when I last wrote List, Eclipse offered me about 4 different types with this name (from java.util, java.awt, SWT, and another one I don't remember now). The bigger your library, the more often you'll get such conflicts, as good names are spare, and thus used often. – Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 5 '11 at 13:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.