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My code is pasted here. Below is my ghci debug session. I still don't understand why it has a range of (0, -193459561) when the 'len' binding is 90570.

*Main> :break 125
Breakpoint 4 activated at SVMCF.hs:125:13-86
*Main> :trace main
Stopped at SVMCF.hs:125:13-86
_result :: UA.Array Int [User] = _
len :: Int = 90570
rts :: [RTuple] = (1,1,5.0) : (1,2,3.0) : (1,3,4.0) : (1,4,3.0) :
                  (1,5,3.0) : ....
[SVMCF.hs:125:13-86] *Main> :lis
124      points :: A.Array Int [Int]
125      points = assert (len > 0) $ A.listArray (1::Int, len) $ map (\(u,i,r) -> [u,i]) rts
126      values :: UA.UArray Int Double
[SVMCF.hs:125:13-86] *Main> :ste
Stopped at SVMCF.hs:125:13-28
_result :: UA.Array Int [User] -> UA.Array Int [User] = _
len :: Int = 90570
[SVMCF.hs:125:13-28] *Main> :ste
Stopped at SVMCF.hs:125:21-27
_result :: Bool = _
len :: Int = 90570
[SVMCF.hs:125:21-27] *Main> :ste
Stopped at SVMCF.hs:125:32-86
_result :: UA.Array Int [User] = _
len :: Int = 90570
rts :: [RTuple] = (1,1,5.0) : (1,2,3.0) : (1,3,4.0) : (1,4,3.0) :
                  (1,5,3.0) : ....
[SVMCF.hs:125:32-86] *Main> :ste
Stopped at SVMCF.hs:125:32-56
_result :: [[User]] -> UA.Array Int [User] = _
len :: Int = 90570
[SVMCF.hs:125:32-56] *Main> :lis
124      points :: A.Array Int [Int]
125      points = assert (len > 0) $ A.listArray (1::Int, len) $ map (\(u,i,r) -> [u,i]) rts
126      values :: UA.UArray Int Double
[SVMCF.hs:125:32-56] *Main> len
90570
[SVMCF.hs:125:32-56] *Main> :ste
Stopped at SVMCF.hs:125:60-86
_result :: [[User]] = _
rts :: [RTuple] = (1,1,5.0) : (1,2,3.0) : (1,3,4.0) : (1,4,3.0) :
                  (1,5,3.0) : ....
[SVMCF.hs:125:60-86] *Main> :ste
*** Exception: Ix{Int}.index: Index (1) out of range ((1,-193459561))
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1  
This does look odd. My first thought was some kind of arithmetic overflow. Int is 32 bits on a 32 bit machine and 64 bits on a 64 bit machine. What does maxBound :: Int evaluate to? However I can't find any straightforward relationship between 90570 and -193459561 –  Paul Johnson Jun 5 '11 at 11:17
    
maxBound :: Int 2147483647 –  James Jun 5 '11 at 13:34
    
Can you also paste the test data (ua.*)? I assume that the SVM module comes from the svm package. –  Mikhail Glushenkov Jun 5 '11 at 18:01
    
Yes, SVM modules comes from svm package, but I add parametric polymorphism to this module, so the code will fail to compile if you use the cabal svm package. The ua.* data are from the stadard movielens dataset, I had paste the ua.test in hpaste.org/47496/movielens_uatest, but ua.base is too large to be pasted. Can I send all my files to you through email? –  James Jun 6 '11 at 3:46
    
If the second file is too large to be pasted, you can upload it to e.g. rapidshare. If the dataset in question is available online, you can just provide a link. –  Mikhail Glushenkov Jun 6 '11 at 15:14

1 Answer 1

I suspect the index out of range exception is not being caused in the expression that you think it is!

Data.Array.listArray (1,-10) [2,3,4,5]

does not throw any exception, it just gives you an empty array. Also note the column numbers in the last debug message:

Stopped at SVMCF.hs:125:60-86

60 to 86 is map (\(u,i,r) -> [u,i]) rts which doesn't obviously have any indexing going on in it: There's certainly none in map, nor in its first argument, and rts looks clean too as it comes straight from ua.base via Parsec.

Because Haskell is allowed to be fairly free with its evaluation order, it's possible that the exception is being thrown by a reduction in a completely different expression. Are you sure all the other things you're passing into SVM are set up correctly? In particular, given that you're using Int-indexed arrays, are you sure there's no integer overflow occurring in any array? Are any of your datasets, for example, 4101507735 or 8396475031 records long, because these overflow to -193459561 as Int).

Does the :history command in the GHCi debugger give you any more information?

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You are right. Finally I found out that it is a Int index overflow, and the source is not in the code pasted here. Though I finally solve this problem, I think this experience make me think that it's hard to debug haskell code. –  James Aug 18 '11 at 7:14

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