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This is mainly a theoretical question i.e I don't have any need for a practical solution but when using foreach in MS V C# 2010 with the following code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            int[] ints = new int[7]{0,0,0,0,0,0,0};
           foreach (int i in ints)
           {
                i = 10;

           }
           Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

I get the error which tells me that I cannot modify i because it is a foreach variable,now if I wanted to I could do this simple task a number of other ways but the thing is I haven't seen anything in the documentation which would disallow what I'm trying to do and I think foreach should give you the ability to change the variable within the list.

Is there something I'm missing?

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1  
It is well documented (with foreach) that the loop variable should not be assigned to. In your example it wouldn't be of any use anyway (i is a copy). –  Henk Holterman Jun 5 '11 at 17:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a for loop instead and modify the values using ints[i]

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If you foreach over a collection you will get the items as readonly. If you change the loop to a traditional for loop you can change the array contents:

  for (int index = 0; index < ints.Length; ++index)
  {
      ints[index] = 10;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Yes thank you I was afraid I might be forced to do that it's simpler but I figured that there had to be something you could do with foreach to modify. Because to have foreach and use it just with readonly seemed wasteful to me at least. –  Bronze_Hero Jun 5 '11 at 19:43

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