Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to subset a dataframe by telling R what not to keep in the new dataframe. Here is a simplified sample dataframe:

data
v1 v2 v3 v4
a  v  d  c
a  v  d  d
b  n  p  g
b  d  d  h    
c  k  d  c    
c  r  p  g
d  v  d  x
d  v  d  c
e  v  d  b
e  v  d  c

If column v1 has a "b", "d", or "e", I want to get rid of that row of observations, producing the following dataframe:

v1 v2 v3 v4
a  v  d  c
a  v  d  d
c  k  d  c    
c  r  p  g

I have been successful at getting rid of one at a time using

sub.data<-data[data[,1] != "b",]

but I have many, many things I'd like to get rid of, so doing it one at a time is not desirable. I have not been successful with the following:

sub.data<-data[data[,1] != c("b","d","e")

or

sub.data<-subset(data, data[,1] != c("b","d","e"))

I've tried some other things as well, like !%in%, but that doesn't seem to exist. Any ideas?

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Try this

subset(data, !(v1 %in% c("b","d","e")))
share|improve this answer
    
Nice and simple, thanks. I'm not sure which solution I like better, this one or the one provided by Andrie. They are both easy and effective. All three solutions work for me, and I have never used which() before. So, it was nice to be introduced to that function. –  Frank Jun 5 '11 at 17:25
7  
If it helps you to make up your mind as to whether to use subset or [, have a look at the warning in the help for ?subset: "This is a convenience function intended for use interactively. For programming it is better to use the standard subsetting functions like [, and in particular the non-standard evaluation of argument subset can have unanticipated consequences." –  Andrie Jun 6 '11 at 12:45
    
@Andrie Thanks for adding clarification. –  chl Jun 6 '11 at 12:55

The ! should be around the outside of the statement:

data[!(data$v1 %in% c("b", "d", "e")), ]

  v1 v2 v3 v4
1  a  v  d  c
2  a  v  d  d
5  c  k  d  c
6  c  r  p  g
share|improve this answer

You can also accomplish this by breaking things up into separate logical statements by including & to separate the statements.

subset(my.df, my.df$v1 != "b" & my.df$v1 != "d" & my.df$v1 != "e")

This is not elegant and takes more code but might be more readable to newer R users. As pointed out in a comment above, subset is a "convenience" function that is best used when working interactively.

share|improve this answer
1  
shouldn't those be | rather than & ? –  Ben Bolker Apr 9 '14 at 13:08
    
@BenBolker If you change to |, you get the same data as were put in. –  Frank Jul 4 '14 at 15:10
1  
@Frank Can you explain the logic of & paired with != here? Like Ben, it seems like | should be used, but you're right that it shouldn't. I'm especially confused about subsetting multiple columns that way. For example, using Herman's sample data above, to remove all cases of "b" from v1 and all of "n" from v2, I would think that my.df[my.df$v1 != "b" & my.df$v2 != "n",] would only remove cases that met both of those criteria (i.e. only Row 3), rather than either of those criteria (i.e. both Row 3 and Row 4). In fact, using | with != does what I expect & to do, but I don't get why. –  coip Feb 12 at 16:45
    
With | a single TRUE result among any of the conditions will cause the whole statement to evaluate to TRUE. All the conditions must evaluate to FALSE for the statement to evaluate to FALSE. With & a single FALSE condition will make the whole statement evaluate to FALSE. If you want to use or, you can use exclusive or: xor like so: subset(my.df, xor(xor(my.df$v1 != "b", my.df$v1 != "d"), my.df$v1 != "e")). –  Frank Feb 13 at 0:11

This answer is more meant to explain why, not how. The '==' operator in R is vectorized in a same way as the '+' operator. It matches the elements of whatever is on the left side to the elements of whatever is on the right side, per element. For example:

> 1:3 == 1:3
[1] TRUE TRUE TRUE

Here the first test is 1==1 which is TRUE, the second 2==2 and the third 3==3. Notice that this returns a FALSE in the first and second element because the order is wrong:

> 3:1 == 1:3
[1] FALSE  TRUE FALSE

Now if one object is smaller then the other object then the smaller object is repeated as much as it takes to match the larger object. If the size of the larger object is not a multiplication of the size of the smaller object you get a warning that not all elements are repeated. For example:

>  1:2 == 1:3
[1]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
Warning message:
In 1:2 == 1:3 :
  longer object length is not a multiple of shorter object length

Here the first match is 1==1, then 2==2, and finally 1==3 (FALSE) because the left side is smaller. If one of the sides is only one element then that is repeated:

> 1:3 == 1
[1]  TRUE FALSE FALSE

The correct operator to test if an element is in a vector is indeed '%in%' which is vectorized only to the left element (for each element in the left vector it is tested if it is part of any object in the right element).

Alternatively, you can use '&' to combine two logical statements. '&' takes two elements and checks elementwise if both are TRUE:

> 1:3 == 1 & 1:3 != 2
[1]  TRUE FALSE FALSE
share|improve this answer
data <- data[-which(data[,1] %in% c("b","d","e")),]
share|improve this answer
1  
-which is evil and will yield unexpected results in cases where none of the values in the vector to match against are in the source vector. –  Ananda Mahto Feb 1 '14 at 18:24
my.df <- read.table(textConnection("
v1 v2 v3 v4
a  v  d  c
a  v  d  d
b  n  p  g
b  d  d  h    
c  k  d  c    
c  r  p  g
d  v  d  x
d  v  d  c
e  v  d  b
e  v  d  c"), header = TRUE)

my.df[which(my.df$v1 != "b" & my.df$v1 != "d" & my.df$v1 != "e" ), ]

  v1 v2 v3 v4
1  a  v  d  c
2  a  v  d  d
5  c  k  d  c
6  c  r  p  g
share|improve this answer
sub.data<-data[ data[,1] != "b"  & data[,1] != "d" & data[,1] != "e" , ]

Larger but simple to understand (I guess) and can be used with multiple columns, even with !is.na( data[,1]).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.