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Is this even possible?

<div class="column">
    <div> 
        <div> 
        </div>    
        <div> <!-- Definitely not this DIV! -->
        </div>    
    </div>
    <div>     <!-- THIS DIV ONLY! -->
    </div>    
</div>

The following CSS selector gets the one I've marked "Definitely not this DIV!".

.column div:last-child {
    background-color:red;
}

The following CSS selector gets the one I want AND the one I've marked "Definitely not this DIV!".

.column div + div {
    background-color:red;
}

Same goes for this one: It gets the one I want AND the one I've marked "Definitely not this DIV!".

.column div:first-child + div {
    background-color:red;
}

Question: Is this even possible to do with CSS that will be recognized by IE7? (I assume my solution will work with FF, Safari, Chrome, and X:nth-child(n) only works with IE9+) Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Just wondering, why not use an ID or CLASS selector? – Jared Farrish Jun 5 '11 at 17:44
    
I'm just trying to keep everything tidy... but really I suppose it's a form of premature optimization. *gets coat* – Chuck Le Butt Jun 5 '11 at 17:47
    
The only reason I say that is that the example at least seems to demonstrate a known form (columns in a layout), so if it's static and semantic, I would think an ID/CLASS would be appropriate in such a case. – Jared Farrish Jun 5 '11 at 17:49
    
You're absolutely right. It is a known, and it shouldn't be changing any time soon. Have I just made a mistake in terms of best practice? – Chuck Le Butt Jun 5 '11 at 17:55
1  
Nah, if it works cross-browser and you're happy with it, go with it. But, my own preference would be to use descriptive attributes within the markup as well as the CSS, just to increase the human-readability and debugging. :) – Jared Farrish Jun 5 '11 at 17:57
up vote 7 down vote accepted

This should do it.

#column > div:first-child + div

You were using a class selector to select an element with an ID.

You may want to look through the CSS Selectors, as it's the direct descendant & sibling selectors that gives you the finesse to choose a particular DOM element.

share|improve this answer
1  
Pretty sure that was a typo. – BoltClock Jun 5 '11 at 17:45
    
Probably, but if he didn't catch it on the answer, there's no reason to assume he'd catch it during development. tyops have consequinces – zzzzBov Jun 5 '11 at 17:46
    
I fixed it when I noticed your answer. Always a pain not to make typos when you're typing into SO. – Chuck Le Butt Jun 5 '11 at 17:57
    
actually, he didn't, but I don't mind giving him the cred. Sort by oldest, and mine will be on top. – zzzzBov Jun 5 '11 at 17:58
    
You're absolutely right. My bad. You got there first (although you may want to take out the class selector thing as I've updated the question now :) – Chuck Le Butt Jun 5 '11 at 18:01

You need to toss in the child combinator > just after #column, otherwise the innermost divs will also be looked at:

#column > div:first-child + div
share|improve this answer
    
Yessir! Thank you very much. – Chuck Le Butt Jun 5 '11 at 17:46

Try this

<style type="text/css">
    div {
        width: 20px;
        height: 20px;
    }
    #column > div + div {
        background-color:red;
    }

</style>
<div id="column">
    <div> 
        <div> 
        </div>    
        <div> <!-- Definitely not this DIV! -->
        </div>    
    </div>
    <div>     <!-- THIS DIV ONLY! -->
    </div>    
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This also works, thanks for the alternative. – Chuck Le Butt Jun 5 '11 at 18:03

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