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I have a script that uses sensors to get CPU temps in Ubuntu.

IN="`/usr/bin/sensors -f | grep 'Core ' | cut -f2 -d"+" | cut -f1 -d '.'`"
echo $IN

It yields results like this

96 100 98 102

What I need to do is be able to call it like cpu1 to get the first, cpu2 to get the second, and so on. I need to split it up so i can monitor core temps using MRTG, there might be a better way, but I havent found one yet.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can convert $IN to an array like this:

TEMPERATURES=($IN)

Then you can index into that array to get a particular temperature; for example:

echo ${TEMPERATURES[0]}

If you pass a command-line parameter to your script, you can use that as an array index:

WHICH=$1                       # 1st command line arg; $0 is name of script
TEMPERATURES=($IN)
echo ${TEMPERATURES[$WHICH]}

Calls to the script might then look like this (assuming the script is called cpu):

$ ./cpu 0
96
$ ./cpu 1
100
$ ./cpu 2
98
$ ./cpu 3
102
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awesome, works a charm! –  Kelso Jun 5 '11 at 18:23
IN="96 100 98 102"       

I=0
for val in $IN; do
  I=$((I+1))
  eval "cpu$I=$val"
done

echo $cpu1

I answered literally how to get $cpu1 etc, but I suggest you do what @Richard suggests and use arrays :)

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Instead of using lots of pipes to extract the cpu temp, you can do it in one single piping with awk:

#!/bin/sh
/usr/bin/sensors -f | awk -F"[+.]" -v c="^Core $1" '$0~c{print $2}'

Usage:

$./cpu 0
$./cpu 1
$./cpu 2
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Another simplified solution, thanks as well! –  Kelso Jun 7 '11 at 13:00

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