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How would i replace a string in a file such that the string to be replaced is always succeeded by some string.

eg: If i want to replace ABC with 123 as below,

INPUT

ABC
ABCXYZ
ABCDHD
ABC
CDE

OUTPUT

ABC
123XYZ
123DHD
ABC
CDE

i tried using sed but with no success.

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sed -i '/ABC./s/ABC/123/g' <file> - how abt this ? –  Prabhu Jayaraman Jun 8 '11 at 4:44
    
thanks to all. wanted to accept all, but can accept only one. –  Prabhu Jayaraman Jun 8 '11 at 4:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
sed -i 's/ABC\(.+\)$/123\1/g' myFile.txt

ABC, match the literal ABC!

\(.+\) match at least 1 other character capture it in group 1

123\1 replace the hole thing with 123 followed by what is captured in group 1

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1  
Some implementations of sed does not support the + as one-or-more of the previous group, however in this case there is no need for it. sed -i 's/ABC\(.\)$/123\1/g' myFile.txt, will work just as well. –  Chen Levy Jun 5 '11 at 21:06
    
@Chen, no it won't: you need to remove the $ anchor, or else you're limiting the following text to exactly 1 char. –  glenn jackman Jun 6 '11 at 5:09
perl -pi.bak -e 's/^ABC(.+)$/123$1/g' file.txt

This will however replace whitespace too. If you do not want that, instead of .+ you can use \S+.

The -i.bak option will save a backup of file.txt in file.txt.bak, in case you bungled the replace.

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this one worked for me:

$ sed   -r  s/ABC\(.+\)/123\\1/g <file>
ABC
123XYZ
123DHD
ABC
CDE
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Without capture using look-ahead:

s/ABC(?=\S)/123/;
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Surprised that no-one has used \B.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

while (<DATA>) {
  s/ABC\B/123/;
  print;
}

__DATA__
ABC
ABCXYZ
ABCDHD
ABC
CDE
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