Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have various roles defined by CanCan in my rails application. I recently implemented jQuery UI autocomplete and it works well. The problem is that when I submit the form, the find_by_name that occurs in the model can find records that do not belong to the current_user. I have the following in my view:

<strong><%= f.label :inventory_name, "Material" %></strong>
<%= f.text_field :inventory_name, :class => "inputbox" %><br>

And my jQuery looks like:

jQuery("input[id$=_inventory_name]").autocomplete({
  source: '/ajax/inventory',
  minLength: 2
});

Then I have an ajax controller that does the right thing:

def inventory
  inventory = Inventory.accessible_by(current_ability)
  if params[:term]
    like= "%".concat(params[:term].concat("%"))
    names = inventory.where("name LIKE ?", like)
  else
    names = inventory
  end

  list = names.map {|u| Hash[ :id => u.id, :label => u.name, :name => u.name]}
  render :json => list
end

But my model does not:

def inventory_name=(name)
  inventory = Inventory.find_by_name(name)
  if inventory
    self.inventory_id = inventory.id
  else
    errors[:inventory_name] << "Invalid name entered"
  end
end
def inventory_name
  Inventory.find(inventory_id).name if inventory_id
end

find_by_name will return the first match it finds regardless of who owns it. Ideally I'd like to change:

inventory = Inventory.find_by_name(name)

to

inventory = Inventory.accessible_by(current_ability).find_by_name(name)

But that violates the principles of MVC not to mention the model has no access to current_ability, current_user or the like. So my question is, how to I move this logic into my controller where I have access to these things? I can't seem to wrap my head around it :(

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I think all you need to do is make your create and update actions in your controller check Inventory.accessible_by(current_ability).

share|improve this answer
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I ended up needing both a before and after filter:

after_filter :save_new_project_inventory, :only => [:create]
before_filter :update_project_inventory, :only => [:create, :update]

...

private
def save_new_project_inventory
  # do this in an after filter so that
  # we will have a project.id
  @project_inventories.each { |key, value|
    value[:project_id] = @project.id
    ProjectInventory.create!(value)
  }
end

def update_project_inventory
  @project_inventories = {}
  params[:project][:project_inventories_attributes].each { |key, value|
    if value[:_destroy] != "false"
      project_inventory = ProjectInventory.find(value[:id])
      project_inventory.delete
    else
      if value[:id]
        project_inventory = ProjectInventory.find(value[:id])
        project_inventory.inventory_id = inventory_name(value[:inventory_name])
        project_inventory.save
      else
        if @project.nil?
          # can't save here because we need a project.id that we
          # won't have until after we save, so finish up in the
          # after filter
          @project_inventories[key] = {
            :inventory_id => inventory_name(value[:inventory_name])
          }
        else
          project_inventory = ProjectInventory.new
          project_inventory.inventory_id = inventory_name(value[:inventory_name])
          project_inventory.project_id = params[:id]
          project_inventory.save
        end
      end
    end
  }
  params[:project].delete(:project_inventories_attributes)
end

def inventory_name(name)
  inventories = Inventory.accessible_by(current_ability)
  inventory = inventories.find_by_name(name)
  if inventory
    inventory.id.to_s
  end
end

I'm not sure if it is the best way to do it, but it works.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.