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I used this ksh function for converting "1-Jan-2011" format to "1.1.2011."

#!/bin/ksh

##---- function to convert 3 char month into numeric value ----------
convertDate()
{
    echo $1 | awk -F"-" '{print $1,$2,$3}' | read day mm yyyy ## split the date arg
    typeset -u mmm=`echo $mm` ## set month to uppercase
    typeset -u months=`cal $yyyy | grep "[A-Z][a-z][a-z]"` ## uppercase list of all months
    i=1 ## starting month
    for mon in $months; do ## loop thru month list
    ## if months match, set numeric month (add zero if needed); else increment month counter
    [[ "$mon" = "$mmm" ]] && typeset -xZ2 monthNum=$i || (( i += 1 ))
    done ## end loop
    echo $day.$monthNum.`echo $yyyy | cut -c3-` ## return all numeric date format ddmmyyyy
}

But I need to use this function with #!/bin/sh. So I tried rewriting it...

#!/bin/sh

##---- function to convert 3 char month into numeric value ----------
convertDate()
{
    echo $1 | awk -F"-" '{print $1,$2,$3}' | read day mm yyyy ## split the date arg
    echo $mm #IT SEEMS LIKE THE PROBLEM IS IN THE PREVIOUS LINE, BECAUSE THIS VARIABLE IS EMPTY IN #!/bin/sh, BUT IF YOU CHANGE IT TO #!/bin/ksh EVERYTHING SEEM TO BE FINE, THEN FUNCTION WORKS CORRECTLY.
    mmm=`echo $mm | tr '[a-z]' '[A-Z]'`
    months=`cal $yyyy | grep "[A-Z][a-z][a-z]" | tr '[a-z]' '[A-Z]'`
    i=1 ## starting month
    for mon in $months; do ## loop thru month list
    ## if months match, set numeric month (add zero if needed); else increment month counter
    if [ "$mon" = "$mmm" ]; then
        monthNum=`printf '%02d' $i`
    else
        i=`expr $i + 1`
    fi
    done ## end loop
    echo $day.$monthNum.`echo $yyyy | cut -c3-` ## return all numeric date format ddmmyyyy
}

convertDate "20-May-2010"

But it doesn't work (read the UPPERCASE comment in the last script) :(

Help!

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need it to run with /bin/sh ? On Solaris 10 and older, this shell isn't designed to be used for new scripts but only there to guarantee compatibility with legacy ones. Edit: sorry, I just noticed you seem to use Linux, not Solaris so this comment doesn't apply. –  jlliagre Jun 5 '11 at 21:16
    
No, I do use Solaris (actually our clients use it, and I'm writing this script for them). But I MUST use /bin/sh (so my boss says, although I disagree). Anyway, geekosour's post helped. Thank You for Your efforts as well :) –  Eedoh Jun 5 '11 at 21:39
1  
If your boss want you to use sh and not ksh, then pick the POSIX compliant bourne shell on Solaris: #!/usr/xpg4/bin/sh –  jlliagre Jun 6 '11 at 9:47
    
Great advice, thanks, vote up! –  Eedoh Jun 6 '11 at 12:04
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that whether the read command runs in a subshell due to the pipeline depends on exactly which shell /bin/sh is; you will get one behavior from bash and another from legacy UNIX (e.g. Solaris) /bin/sh. Use set instead.

set -- `echo $1 | awk -F"-" '{print $1,$2,$3}'`

although I would probably write

oIFS="$IFS"
IFS=-
set -- $1
IFS="$oIFS"
share|improve this answer
    
GREAT!!! for(int i=0; i<1000000; i++){ cout<<"Thank You!\n"; } I know this "thanks" is C++, not in shell, but I think it'l doo :D –  Eedoh Jun 5 '11 at 19:45
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