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This is a follow-up to my previous question on pretty-printing STL containers, for which we managed to develop a very elegant and fully general solution.


In this next step, I would like to include pretty-printing for std::tuple<Args...>, using variadic templates (so this is strictly C++11). For std::pair<S,T>, I simply say

std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream & o, const std::pair<S,T> & p)
{
  return o << "(" << p.first << ", " << p.second << ")";
}

What is the analogous construction for printing a tuple?

I've tried various bits of template argument stack unpacking, passing indices around and using SFINAE to discover when I'm at the last element, but with no success. I shan't burden you with my broken code; the problem description is hopefully straight-forward enough. Essentially, I'd like the following behaviour:

auto a = std::make_tuple(5, "Hello", -0.1);
std::cout << a << std::endl; // prints: (5, "Hello", -0.1)

Bonus points for including the same level of generality (char/wchar_t, pair delimiters) as the the previous question!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 37 down vote accepted

Yay, indices~

namespace aux{
template<std::size_t...> struct seq{};

template<std::size_t N, std::size_t... Is>
struct gen_seq : gen_seq<N-1, N-1, Is...>{};

template<std::size_t... Is>
struct gen_seq<0, Is...> : seq<Is...>{};

template<class Ch, class Tr, class Tuple, std::size_t... Is>
void print_tuple(std::basic_ostream<Ch,Tr>& os, Tuple const& t, seq<Is...>){
  using swallow = int[];
  (void)swallow{0, (void(os << (Is == 0? "" : ", ") << std::get<Is>(t)), 0)...};
}
} // aux::

template<class Ch, class Tr, class... Args>
auto operator<<(std::basic_ostream<Ch, Tr>& os, std::tuple<Args...> const& t)
    -> std::basic_ostream<Ch, Tr>&
{
  os << "(";
  aux::print_tuple(os, t, aux::gen_seq<sizeof...(Args)>());
  return os << ")";
}

Live example on Ideone.


For the delimiter stuff, just add these partial specializations:

// Delimiters for tuple
template<class... Args>
struct delimiters<std::tuple<Args...>, char> {
  static const delimiters_values<char> values;
};

template<class... Args>
const delimiters_values<char> delimiters<std::tuple<Args...>, char>::values = { "(", ", ", ")" };

template<class... Args>
struct delimiters<std::tuple<Args...>, wchar_t> {
  static const delimiters_values<wchar_t> values;
};

template<class... Args>
const delimiters_values<wchar_t> delimiters<std::tuple<Args...>, wchar_t>::values = { L"(", L", ", L")" };

and change the operator<< and print_tuple accordingly:

template<class Ch, class Tr, class... Args>
auto operator<<(std::basic_ostream<Ch, Tr>& os, std::tuple<Args...> const& t)
    -> std::basic_ostream<Ch, Tr>&
{
  typedef std::tuple<Args...> tuple_t;
  if(delimiters<tuple_t, Ch>::values.prefix != 0)
    os << delimiters<tuple_t,char>::values.prefix;

  print_tuple(os, t, aux::gen_seq<sizeof...(Args)>());

  if(delimiters<tuple_t, Ch>::values.postfix != 0)
    os << delimiters<tuple_t,char>::values.postfix;
}

And

template<class Ch, class Tr, class Tuple, std::size_t... Is>
void print_tuple(std::basic_ostream<Ch, Tr>& os, Tuple const& t, seq<Is...>){
  using swallow = int[];
  char const* delim = delimiters<Tuple, Ch>::values.delimiter;
  if(!delim) delim = "";
  (void)swallow{0, (void(os << (Is == 0? "" : delim) << std::get<Is>(t)), 0)...};
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Kerrek: I'm currently testing & fixing myself, I get weird output on Ideone though. –  Xeo Jun 5 '11 at 21:03
    
Make the base case 1, not 0, to avoid the extraneous delimiter... –  Kerrek SB Jun 5 '11 at 21:04
    
I think you're also confusing streams and strings. You're writing something akin to "std::cout << std::cout". In other words, TuplePrinter doesn't have an operator<<. –  Kerrek SB Jun 5 '11 at 21:13
1  
@Thomas: You can't just use class Tuple for the operator<< overload - it would get picked for any and all things. It would need a constraint, which kinda implies the need for some kind of variadic arguments. –  Xeo Mar 19 '13 at 22:56
1  
@DanielFrey: That's a solved problem, list-initialization guarantees left-to-right order: swallow{(os << get<Is>(t))...};. –  Xeo Mar 30 '13 at 2:11

and here is another implementation:

https://github.com/galaxyeye/atlas/blob/master/atlas/io/tuple.h

with the test code :

https://github.com/galaxyeye/atlas/blob/master/libs/serialization/test/tuple.cpp

enjoy :)

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, thanks - you should make the output stream templated, though :-) –  Kerrek SB Aug 9 '13 at 8:59

I got this working fine in C++11 (gcc 4.7). There are I am sure some pitfalls I have not considered but I think the code is easy to read and and not complicated. The only thing that may be strange is the "guard" struct tuple_printer that ensure that we terminate when the last element is reached. The other strange thing may be sizeof...(Types) that return the number of types in Types type pack. It is used to determine the index of the last element (size...(Types) - 1).

template<typename Type, unsigned N, unsigned Last>
struct tuple_printer {

    static void print(std::ostream& out, const Type& value) {
        out << std::get<N>(value) << ", ";
        tuple_printer<Type, N + 1, Last>::print(out, value);
    }
};

template<typename Type, unsigned N>
struct tuple_printer<Type, N, N> {

    static void print(std::ostream& out, const Type& value) {
        out << std::get<N>(value);
    }

};

template<typename... Types>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const std::tuple<Types...>& value) {
    out << "(";
    tuple_printer<std::tuple<Types...>, 0, sizeof...(Types) - 1>::print(out, value);
    out << ")";
    return out;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that looks sensible - perhaps with another specialization for the empty tuple, for completeness. –  Kerrek SB Jul 4 '13 at 15:24

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