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Confusing Situation
I have a situation where I have 2 entities where 1 inherits from the other, that need to map to 2 separate tables, but code use should be around the base of the 2 entities.

Details

public class Team
{
  public virtual int Id { get; set; }
  public virtual ICollection<Employee> Members { get; set; }
}
public class Employee
{
  public virtual int Id { get; set; }
  public virtual string Name { get; set; }
  public virtual ICollection<Team> Teams { get; set; }
}

public class EmployeeInfo : Employee
{
  public virtual int Id { get; set; }
  public virtual decimal Amount { get; set; }
}

We have an existing database schema where Employee and EmployeeInfo are separate tables with a FK between EmployeeInfo_Id and Employee_Id.

In our system "managers" will be adding Employee's to the system, with a set of private information (more properties than listed above) like pay, and add them to a Team. Other areas of the system will be using the Team or Employee objects for various other things. We would like to have to code super simple if the mapping can be done.

When a manager creates a new employee we would like the code to look something like this:

public void Foo(string name, decimal pay)
{
  // create the employee
  var employee = new EmployeeInfo();
  employee.Name = name;
  employee.Pay = pay;

  // add him/her to the team
  _team.Employees.Add(employee);   // the idea being that consumers of the Team entity would not get the separate employee info properties

  // save the context
  _context.SaveChanges();
}

The end result would be that the EmployeeInfo properties entered into the EmployeeInfo table and the base Employee data is entered into the Employee table and added to the Team via the association table TeamEmployees.

So far I'm trying the current mappings, and I get an invalid column named "Discriminator." When just adding an employee to a team.

public class TeamConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<Team>
{
    public TeamConfiguration()
    {
        ToTable("Team");

        HasKey(t => t.Id);
        HasMany(t => t.Members).WithMany(m => m.Teams)
            .Map(m =>
                     {
                         m.MapLeftKey("Team_Id");
                         m.MapRightKey("Employee_Id");
                         m.ToTable("TeamEmployees");
                     });
    }
}

public class EmployeeConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<Employee>
{
    public EmployeeConfiguration()
    {
        ToTable("Employee");
        ToTable("EmployeeInfo");

        HasKey(t => t.Id);
        Property(p => p.Name);

        HasMany(m => m.Teams)
            .WithMany(t => t.Members)
            .Map(m =>
                     {
                         m.MapLeftKey("Employee_Id");
                         m.MapRightKey("Team_Id");
                         m.ToTable("TeamEmployees");
                     });
    }
}

Also, if I take the many-to-many between team and employee out of the mix I get a FK exception on Employee_Id to EmployeeInfo_Id.

Thanks, JR.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+200

Discriminator is a column that's being added to your table when you use Table Per Hierarchy approach.
I think what you're looking for is "Table per Type (TPT)". Decorate your EmployeeInfo class as follows:

[Table("EmployeeInfo")]
public class EmployeeInfo : Employee 

Or add below to your OnModelCreating event:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
 ...
 modelBuilder.Entity<EmployeeInfo>().ToTable("EmployeeInfo");
 ...
}  

Or, create the following class and use it like modelBuilder.Configurations.Add(new EmployeeInfoConfiguration()); in OnModelCreating method:

public class EmployeeInfoConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<EmployeeInfo>
{
    public EmployeeInfoConfiguration()
    {
        ToTable("EmployeeInfo");
    }
}

This will cause EF to create EmployeeInfo table with necessary constraints.

Also, it's good to initialize your collections in your objects' constructors to prevent null exception. For example in Team class:

public Team()
{
    this.Employees = new HashSet<Employee>();
}  

I copied your code exactly, and changed the following parts:

public class Team
{
    public Team()
    {
        this.Members = new HashSet<Employee>();
    }
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Employee> Members { get; set; }
}
public class Employee
{
    public Employee()
    {
     this.Teams = new HashSet<Team>();
    }

    public virtual int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Team> Teams { get; set; }
}

[Table("EmployeeInfo")]
public class EmployeeInfo : Employee
{
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual decimal Amount { get; set; }
}  

In the DbContext, no changes:

public partial class TestEntities : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Employee> Employees { get; set; }
    public DbSet<EmployeeInfo> Employee_Info { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Team> Teams { get; set; }
}  

and your working Foo method:

public static void Foo(string name, decimal pay)
{
    var _team = new Team();
    var context = new TestEntities();
    context.Teams.Add(_team);

    // create the employee
    var employee = new EmployeeInfo();
    employee.Name = name;
    employee.Amount = pay;
    context.Employees.Add(employee);
    context.SaveChanges();

    // add him/her to the team
    _team.Members.Add(employee);   

    // save the context
    context.SaveChanges();
}  

Finally, remove ToTable("EmployeeInfo"); part from EmployeeConfiguration since you have mentioned this correctly in your mode creating event.

For more info about Table Per Type approach, check out this great article.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll test this out and see how it goes. Is there a way to accomplish this same thing without using the [Table] attribute on EmployeeInfo? –  J.r. Hounddog Jun 11 '11 at 14:00
    
I have not tested this, but you should be able to use modelBuilder.Entity<EmployeeInfo>().ToTable("EmployeeInfo"); in Fluent API. –  Kamyar Jun 12 '11 at 5:00
    
I have updated my answer. You have 3 ways to accomplish it. –  Kamyar Jun 12 '11 at 11:27
    
Perfect. Thank you. –  J.r. Hounddog Jun 12 '11 at 14:58
    
@J.r. Hounddog: No problem. And good luck. –  Kamyar Jun 13 '11 at 6:21

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