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I can't figure out why this piece of code isn't working:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html><head></head><body onload="
document.body.addEventListener('mousedown',function(e){
alert(123);
},false);
"></body></html>

There isn't even any error whatsoever.. it just does nothing.

amazingly if i change 'mousedown' to 'keydown' it works

   <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html><head></head><body onload="
    document.body.addEventListener('keydown',function(e){
    alert(123);
    },false);
    "></body></html>

(I'm using chrome btw)

share|improve this question
    
@lonsomeday ur browser? –  Pacerier Jun 5 '11 at 23:00
    
Hm, why would you want to attach an event in an onload inline event handler... –  kapa Jun 5 '11 at 23:04
    
Sorry, misread the question. –  lonesomeday Jun 5 '11 at 23:08
    
@bazmegakapa . the file is saved as test.html –  Pacerier Jun 5 '11 at 23:17
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The value of this in listeners attached to the body element behaves a little differently in different browsers. Try the following in Firefox and an older version of IE (note that it's specifically for this case, it isn't meant to be a general "what is this?" function):

<head>
<title>Some "this" tests</title>

<script type="text/javascript">

var whatIs = (function(global) {
  return function(that) {

    // If String(that) isn't useful, try some stuff
    if (String(that) == '[object]') {
      if (that == global || that == window) {
        alert('window');
      } else if (typeof that.tagName == 'string') {
        alert(that.tagName);
      } else {
        alert(that);
      }

    // Otherwise show that
    } else {
      alert(that);
    }
  }
})(this);

</script>
</head>
<body onclick="whatIs(this);"  onload="whatIs(this);">
  <div onmousedown="whatIs(this)">this</div>
</body>

In all browsers, the onload shows window and clicking on the div show this as the div. Clicking on the body shows this to be window in Firefox but the body element in IE, Opera and Chrome.

share|improve this answer
    
nice find. so is firefox wrong or is firefox right and every1 else wrong? –  Pacerier Jun 6 '11 at 0:46
1  
Nobody's wrong. Everyone just don't agree. –  Jhourlad Estrella Jun 6 '11 at 3:10
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It works fine (see the code).

Notice that I added some content and added a border to body so that you can see its dimensions. If you remove the content, everything you see is a black line. body does not take up any space if there is no content (like any other block element) which implies you cannot click inside of it.

It seems you thought that body would spread across the whole browser window, but that is not the case.

If you attach the handler to window instead, it gets all events that happen inside the visible area.

share|improve this answer
1  
if you are saying body doesn't spread across the whole browser window.. how do you explain why does <body style='background-color:red;'> make the entire screen red? –  Pacerier Jun 5 '11 at 23:31
    
@Pacerier: Good question... the answer could lie here: developer.mozilla.org/en/HTML/Element/body. body has a decprecated bgcolor attribute which sets the background color of the document. I assume that that the CSS background-color is applied the same way (for backwards compatibility?) See also developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/document.bgColor –  Felix Kling Jun 5 '11 at 23:35
    
@Pacerier: If you use Chrome anyway, click somewhere in the window, select Inspect Element from the context menu and select the body element in the DOM tree. You will see the highlight in the page and it does not cover the whole view. –  Felix Kling Jun 5 '11 at 23:45
    
cool great find =D –  Pacerier Jun 6 '11 at 0:47
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An alternative is to use jQuery bind. It does not only make you code less but is also supported by most browsers. Try this one:

$('body').bind('click mousedown', function() {
  alert(123);
});
share|improve this answer
    
I think you have that backwards - browsers don't support a bind method for DOM elements, jQuery has a bind method for its jQuery objects. :-) –  RobG Jun 6 '11 at 0:03
    
haha yeah ok. sorry. –  Jhourlad Estrella Jun 6 '11 at 0:20
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Try using the global window object instead:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html><head></head><body onload="
window.addEventListener('click',function(e){
alert(123);
},false);
"></body></html>

For the given HTML, the body has no height and width, so it will not receive any mouse events when you click on the window. It still can receive key events though. If you give it a height and width, it will work.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html><head></head><body style="height:1000px; width:1000px" onload="
document.body.addEventListener('mousedown',function(e){
alert(123);
},false);
"></body></html>
share|improve this answer
    
btw why is the theory for that document.body doesn't work if its a mousedown but works if its a keydown? –  Pacerier Jun 5 '11 at 23:19
    
It does work, you just can't click on something with 0 height and width... –  S. Albano Jun 6 '11 at 3:35
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