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I have a memory leak in my iPhone app. I added Google AdMob to my app using sample code downloaded from Google. However, I was having a hard time getting it into testing mode so I added an extra variable as follows:

GADRequest *r = [[GADRequest alloc] init];
r.testing = YES;
[bannerView_ loadRequest:r];

I found the memory leak using Instruments. Instruments does not lead me to this line of code, it just dumps me in the main.m file. However, when I comment out the code relating to AdMob the leak goes away and I know enough to see that I haven't taken care of releasing this new variable. I just don't know exactly how I should set about releasing it. The variable r is not addressed in the header file so this is all the code that deals with it.

I tried adding:

- (void)dealloc {
[r release];
....
}

but that caused a build error saying "'r' undeclared". That's weird because it looks to me like I'm declaring r in the first quoted line above but I guess that's wrong. Any help would be much appreciated. I really have tried to educate myself about memory leaks but I still find them very confusing.

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3 Answers 3

Just add [r release]; right below the code:

GADRequest *r = [[GADRequest alloc] init];
r.testing = YES;
[bannerView_ loadRequest:r];
[r release];

The variable r is declared only in that section of your code, so that's where it should be released. The point of releasing is to get rid of it as soon as you no longer need it, so the above should work perfectly for you.

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+1 Better than needlessly keeping it around as an ivar and better then putting it in an autorelease pool for no reason. –  Matthew Frederick Jun 6 '11 at 1:22
    
@Matthew: While it surely gives a straight-forward answer on what to do instead, it doesn't help OP understand why what he did was wrong and what caused the compiler warnings, which imho would most likely be helpful for OP, given OP being (apparently) new to Objective-C. –  Regexident Jun 6 '11 at 9:31

If your r is locally declared (as it seems, judging from your snippet), then it cannot be accessed from outside its scope (here: the method it was declared in). You either need to make it accessible within your class instance by declaring it an ivar.

Declaring it an ivar would look like this:

@interface YourClass : SuperClass {
    GADRequest *request;
}

//...

@end

You then change your code to this:

request = [[GADRequest alloc] init];
request.testing = YES;
[bannerView_ loadRequest:request];

Also don't forget to release it in dealloc:

- (void)dealloc {
    [request release];
    //...
}

However this is not what you want in this situation (I've just included it to clarify why you get the warning about r not being declared).

You (most likely) won't need request any second time after your snippet has run, thus storing it in an ivar will only needlessly occupy RAM and add unwantd complexity to your class. Stuff you only need at the immediate time after its creation should be taken care of (released) accordingly, that is within the very same scope.


What you'll actually want to do is simply (auto)release it, properly taking care of it.

Keep in mind though that your loadRequest: will need to take care of retaining r for as long as it needs it. Apple's implementation does this, of course. But you might want to write a similar method on your own one day, so keep this in mind then.

GADRequest *r = [[GADRequest alloc] init];
r.testing = YES;
[bannerView_ loadRequest:r];
[r release]; //or: [r autorelease];
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2  
XenElement's answer is a better solution: r isn't needed outside this scope so it needn't be an ivar; bannerView_ will retain it in whatever way it normally deals with its request objects, which it should be smart about since relying on someone else to retain it would be bad code; and there's no need to needlessly put it in the autorelease pool where it won't be released until the end of the runloop (or a pool drain) since it's not needed at any point past the [bannerView_ loadRequest:r] line. –  Matthew Frederick Jun 6 '11 at 1:21
    
I'm totally aware that making it an ivar is not what OP wants. I included it though to explain his compiler warnings. Should have made more clear though, that a local release would be a proper fix. And as for the autorelease: most methods in Cocoa return autoreleased objects, so it's not uncommon. Google even puts an autorelease in their setter(!) methods. And given that OP appears to be rather new to ObjC I wouldn't assume he knows that methods à la loadRequest: must retain args, thus worth mentioning, imho. –  Regexident Jun 6 '11 at 8:57
    
Just to be clear, I didn't downvote your answer or anything, just expressed my opinion. I agree that an explanation is for the best, I just felt that the ivar suggestion could lead him down the wrong road. I do know that autorelease is used in plenty of places, and it's no shock that Google uses them since, I assume, most of their programmers come from a garbage collected background. I'm still of the opinion, though, that learning to manually release every time you get the chance is a better lesson than relying on autorelease, since the latter can get you into real trouble (even if not here). –  Matthew Frederick Jun 6 '11 at 10:08
    
I should have made it more clear in my answer that the ivar "solution" was merely an educational fix for his compiler warnings and not a proper solution of his problem. I updated my answer in the meanwhile. Should be clear now. Actually I, too try to use manual releasing whenever appropriate. ;) Oh and no worries, even if you had downvoted, you had good points after all ;) Just wanted to make sure its clear why my answer was providing what at first glance might seem to be a wrong solution and why I chose to still keep it. For newbies it just seldomly helps to be told what to do, w/o the why. –  Regexident Jun 6 '11 at 10:20

OP here. Thanks for all the detailed and thoughtful responses. This has definitely helped get a better handle on memory management. I did exactly as recommended, adding [r release]; right below the posted code. However, I still have a leak. I have isolated it to a single line of code. The following leaks:

GADRequest *r = [[GADRequest alloc] init];
r.testing = YES;
[bannerView_ loadRequest:r];
[r release];

The following does not leak:

GADRequest *r = [[GADRequest alloc] init];
r.testing = YES;
// [bannerView_ loadRequest:r];
[r release];

I figure I'm changing the retain count on bannerView with the loadRequest but I don't know how to fix it. I tried a [bannerView_ release] immediately after the [r release]; line (i.e. releasing locally) but that didn't work. I didn't expect it to because bannerView_ is declared elsewhere. I tried [bannerView_ release]; in the dealloc method but that didn't work. I also tried [bannerView_ autorelease]; locally. The wise heads at Google put [bannerView_ release]; in the ViewDidUnload method.

It's possible that Instruments is just messing with my head. The leak appears after about 10 seconds but the app performs well and the amount of memory leaked doesn't seem to be spirally upwards as the app continues to run. Is there such a thing as a benign memory leak?

Thanks again for your help,

Dessie.

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First off, this seems like a different question, or at least an add on which you could insert into the original question with edit. Second, the leak is coming from the bannerView_. Look in your bannerView_ file and see if r is released in the loadRequest method. –  XenElement Jun 8 '11 at 0:47

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