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I'm trying to use named pipes. I have a process which reads info and another which writes info into the pipe.

This is the reduced code of my reader process:

main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
  int fd, mkn;
  char message[100];

  if(unlink("aPipe") == -1) {
      perror("Error unlinking:");
  }


  if((mkn = mknod("aPipe", S_IFIFO, 0)) < 0){
    perror("Error mknod:");
  }

  if(chmod("aPipe", 0660)) {
    perror("Error chmod:");
   }

  if(fd = open("aPipe", O_RDONLY) < 0) {
    perror("Error abriendo el PIPE");
   }

    printf("going to read..\n");

close(fd);
}

but it gets stuck in this line: if(fd = open("aPipe", O_RDONLY) < 0) forever, and I really dont understand why.

If you know which man page says what is happening here, please tell me :)

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Which process is responsible for creating the FIFO: the reader or the writer (or should it be created before either starts)? If your reader removes the FIFO created by the writer, it will block on open because there is no writer on its new pipe; conversely, if the writer removes the FIFO created by the reader, it will block on open because there is no reader. Also, you should be using mkfifo() and not mknod() (although once upon two decades or so ago, you would have used mknod() because mkfifo() did not exist). –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 6 '11 at 4:20
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3 Answers

FIFOs are a bit strange; open() as a writer will block until there's a reader, and vice versa. Worse, just like a real pipe, when the writer closes its end the read end will return EOF forever; you have to close and reopen (blocking for the next reader). Or you open(fifo, O_RDWR) and then you need some way to know when the writer is done such as having it use only a single line or having an in-band EOF packet.

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Here is the code:

Reader:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h> 
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

readline(int fd, char *str) {
int n;
do {
    n = read(fd, str, 1);
    if(n == -1){
        perror("Error reading:");
    }
}
while(n > 0 && (str++) != NULL);

return(n > 0);

}

main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
int fd, mkn;
char message[100];

if(unlink("aPipe") == -1) {
    perror("Error unlinking:");
}

if((mkn = mknod("aPipe", S_IFIFO, 0)) < 0){
    perror("Error mknod:");
}

if(chmod("aPipe", 0660)) {
    perror("Error chmod:");
}

if(fd = open("aPipe", O_RDONLY) < 0) {
    perror("Error abriendo el PIPE");
}
printf("going to read..\n");
while(readline(fd,message))
    printf("%s\n", message);
close(fd);
}

The writer:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <string.h>

main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
int fd, messagelen,i;
char message[100];

sprintf(message, "Hello from PID %d", getpid());

messagelen = strlen(message) + 1;
do {
    fd = open("aPipe", O_WRONLY|O_NDELAY);
    if (fd == -1) {
        perror("opening aPipe:");
        sleep(1);
    }
}
while(fd == -1);

for (i = 1; i < 4; i++) {
    if(write(fd, message, messagelen) == -1) {
        perror("Error writing:");
    }
    sleep(3);
}
close(fd);
} 

I have to learn makefifo too, but after I understand this.

Thank you very much for your valuable help!

share|improve this answer
    
If you want to add something, you should edit your question instead of adding an answer, unless you've found the solution yourself and you're actually answering your own question. –  falstro Jun 7 '11 at 7:56
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Is there any process writing to the FIFO? If no, this is the expected behaviour since you opened the FIFO RDONLY in blocking mode, the current process will not proceed until there is a process actually write to the FIFO.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I have this process that opens the pipe :fd = open("aPipe", O_WRONLY|O_NDELAY); That call to open is whithin a do while(fd == -1);, but no matter what, it always shows the error : No such device or address –  Lucy Jun 6 '11 at 2:39
    
One side has to pass O_CREAT to open() in order to create the pipe. –  Nemo Jun 6 '11 at 2:45
    
does not mknod create the pipe? –  Lucy Jun 6 '11 at 2:46
    
I would use mkfifo() system call to create a FIFO. And, it would be helpful if you could show us your code for the collaborating writing process. –  Moses Xu Jun 6 '11 at 3:53
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