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I had a query that returned multiple rows from a table. Then I converted that query to this one:

;with mycte as 
(select s.FirstName + ' ' + s.LastName as Name from ClientStaff cs 
left outer join Staff s on s.Id = cs.StaffId 
left outer join GeneralStatus gs on gs.Id = s.StatusId
 where cs.ClientId = @clientId and gs.Name = 'Active')

 select @staff = (select distinct staff = REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE((select Name AS [data()] FROM mycte a 
 order by a.Name for xml path),'</row><row>',', '),'</row>',''),'<row>','') from mycte b)

It returns those rows in a single comma-separated row. Now I don't want comma-separated values, instead I want single-line-separated values. Can anyone tell me if it is possible or not?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted
declare @staff varchar(max)

;with mycte as 
(
    select distinct s.FirstName + ' ' + s.LastName as Name 
    from ClientStaff cs 
        left outer join Staff s on 
            s.Id = cs.StaffId 
        left outer join GeneralStatus gs on 
        gs.Id = s.StatusId
    where cs.ClientId = @clientId and gs.Name = 'Active'
)
select @staff = isnull(@staff + char(13), '') + Name
from mycte b

print @staff
share|improve this answer
    
It's still comma-separated. I need line-separation. – asma Jun 6 '11 at 4:50
    
@asma - you need to use char(13). Updated the answer. – Alex Aza Jun 6 '11 at 4:55
    
+1, but depending on whether the output is meant to be processed additionally after consuming or used directly for displaying, it might be better to use CHAR(13) + CHAR(10) as the delimiter. – Andriy M Jun 6 '11 at 5:20
    
@Andriy M - 100% agree. – Alex Aza Jun 6 '11 at 5:23
    
great!! Thanks a lot Alex :) – asma Jun 6 '11 at 5:46

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