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I have a situation where i need to call something like this :

class Office

  attr_accessor :workers, :id

  def initialize
    @workers = []
  end

  def workers worker
    type = worker.type
    resp = Worker.post("/office/#{@id}/workers.json", :worker => {:type => type})
    worker = Worker.new()
    resp.to_hash.each_pair do |k,v|
      worker.send("#{k}=",v) if worker.respond_to?(k)
    end
    self.workers << worker
  end

end

Worker class

class Worker
  attr_accessor :office_id, :type, :id

  def initialize(options={})
    @office_id = options[:office].nil? ? nil : options[:office].id
    @type = options[:type].nil? ? nil : options[:type].camelize
    if !@office_id.nil?
       resp = self.class.post("/office/#{@office_id}/workers.json", :worker => {:type => @type})
       @id = resp.id
       office = options[:office]
       office.workers = self
    end
  end

  def <<(worker)
    if worker
      type = worker.type
      resp = Worker.post("/office/#{office_id}/workers.json", :worker => {:type => type})
      debugger
      @id = resp.id
      resp.to_hash.each_pair do |k,v|
        self.send("#{k}=",v) if self.respond_to?(k)
      end
      debugger
      return self
    end
  end

I can do something like this very well

office = Office.new()
new_worker = Worker.new()
office.workers new_worker

But i need to do same what i have done above like the following. Before that, i need to change the initialize method of Office to fire up the def <<(worker) method of the worker instance.

class Office
  ...
  def initialize
    @workers = Worker.new
    @workers.office_id = self.id
  end


office = Office.new()
new_worker = Worker.new()
office.workers << new_worker

Now the problem is, the later implementation creates 2 instances of the worker??

share|improve this question
    
What does the code do ? –  Zabba Jun 6 '11 at 6:06
3  
@zabba, it adds new worker object within worker attributes of office object and the worker attribute is an array. –  Manish Das Jun 6 '11 at 6:08
1  
Did you change more of the code than just that? As it is, office.workers << new_worker should be an ArgumentError since office.workers is a method taking 1 parameter. –  Jim Deville Jun 6 '11 at 6:10
1  
@James, no that part is fine. –  Manish Das Jun 6 '11 at 6:12
    
btw, "if !worker.nil?" is better expressed as "if worker" –  Jim Deville Jun 6 '11 at 6:12

2 Answers 2

I'm not entirely sure, but I suppose you'd like to have this:

class Office

  attr_accessor :workers, :id

  def initialize
    @workers = []
  end

  alias_method :workers, :return_worker_array

  def workers worker
    unless worker
      return_worker_array
    else
      type = worker.type
      resp = Worker.post("/office/#{@id}/workers.json", :worker => {:type => type})
      worker = Worker.new()
      resp.to_hash.each_pair do |k,v|
      worker.send("#{k}=",v) if worker.respond_to?(k)
      return_worker_array << worker
  end
end

end

This way you can get rid of Worker#<< entirely and you should also remove the line

office.workers = self

in Worker#initialize since office.workers is supposed to be an array. It's a bad idea to change the type of an attribute (duck-typing would be OK) back and forth because it's likely you lose track of the current state and you will run into errors sooner or later.

To follow "Separation of Concerns", I would recommend to do the entire management of workers solely in Office, otherwise it gets too confusing too quickly and will be much harder to maintain on the long run.

share|improve this answer

I'm not 100% certain why you aren't getting an error here, but since Office#workers last line is self.workers << worker, you are adding the new worker created in Office#workers (made on the 3rd line of the method), and then returning the workers object, which then gets #<< called again on it with the new worker created outside of the method

share|improve this answer
2  
yeah thats why its messed up in order to implement that .... so any idea how i can implement #<< method when i call office.workers << new_worker as i have done in office.workers new_worker –  Manish Das Jun 6 '11 at 6:37
    
i'd choose a different name for the attribute so you can do office.workers new_worker and office.new_worker_name << new_worker. Ideally, i would have chosen office.add_worker new_worker and office.workers << new_worker, but it seems you have legacy code to support so you don't want to change the previous calls. (I know this isn't what you asked for, but that's how i would do this. If you explained the scenario better, i might be able to give a different answer) –  Jim Deville Jun 6 '11 at 6:53
2  
I just want same functioning for the later method as i have done in previous one and with same name. when i call office.workers << new_worker it simply calls the default getter/setter of workers attribute. –  Manish Das Jun 6 '11 at 7:00

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