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I am working on a small c++ program and learning exceptions. Is the following code "bad", and if so, what can I do to improve it?

try {
    // code
    if (some error) {
        throw "Description of error.";
    }
}
catch (char* errorMessage) {
    cerr << errorMessage << endl << "Fatal error";
}

Is there anything wrong with throwing a char array as an exception?

EDIT: Would this be a better way to go?

const char errorMessage[] = "Description of error";

try {
    // code
    if (some error) {
        throw errorMessage;
    }
}
catch (char* errorMessage) {
   cerr << errorMessage << endl << "Fatal error";
}
share|improve this question
3  
A more searchable title might be "C++ - is it bad to throw a string as an exception?". –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jun 6 '11 at 6:29
2  
@Merlyn That is not a std::string, but a c-type string –  BЈовић Jun 6 '11 at 7:52
3  
@VJo: The point is that the title isn't searchable, and I think it would be good to change it. But to address your point, I think "string" is commonly used to refer to a std::string or one of the many variants of char*, and looking at the accepted answer, it would still be applicable to the question being asked. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jun 6 '11 at 8:16

7 Answers 7

up vote 40 down vote accepted

It is much better to throw a standard exception object. In general, the best practice is to throw something derived from std::exception so that if in some situation it does cause your program to terminate, the implementation has a better chance of printing a useful diagnostic.

Because it isn't hard to do this, I would never recommend throwing a raw string literal.

#include <stdexcept>

void someFunction()
{
    try {
        // code
        if (some error) {
            throw std::runtime_error( "Description of error." );
        }
    }
    catch (const std::exception& ex) {
        std::cerr << ex.what() << "\nFatal error" << std::endl;
    }
}
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2  
@GeneBushuyev: This is a potential concern, but if such a minimal allocation fails you are normally in a very bad way anyway. If I was in a situation where this was more than a theoretical concern, I would probably still use a true exception object derived from std::exception whose overloaded what() returned a pointer to a literal string. Space for an exception object (even if only a pointer) always has to be allocate and the exception object initialized whenever an exception is thrown. –  Charles Bailey Jun 6 '11 at 7:26
1  
@Tony: Where do you think the exception object is stored? Stack doesn't seem to make sense so the pointer must be stored elsewhere. It might not be the heap, it might be a special reserved memory area. A good implementation might reserve space for the maximum size of exception ever thrown so that throw never fails. Whether that's a pointer or an object that can be initialized without allocating further heap memory now makes no difference. –  Charles Bailey Jun 6 '11 at 8:13
1  
@GeneBushuyev Where did you find this. std::exception doesn't contain a string (or shouldn't---what it actually contains is, of course, implementation dependent). For exceptions which might be thrown when resources are limited, you can derive directly from std::exception, and override what to return a constant string. (This is what is what I would expect from std::bad_alloc, for example.) –  James Kanze Jun 6 '11 at 8:30
1  
@Tim: A std::runtime_error stores the string that it is constructed with. Usually (but not necessarily), this will involve dynamically allocated memory. A literal string has static storage duration. If you throw something that pointed to an object with automatic storage duration (e.g. a char array "on the stack") and that object was not in scope in the exception handler then you would have a serious potential error. –  Charles Bailey Jun 6 '11 at 8:30
1  
@Tony Certainly. But not std::exception. You can derived from std::exception to create exceptions which do not require dynamically allocated resources, for special cases where resources are tight. –  James Kanze Jun 6 '11 at 9:07

Throwing a string literal is generally a bad idea because, as the code evolves, programmers may need to enrich the error message with some more information, e.g. the value of a variable, or the line number from which the exception is thrown.

Given unknown client code that's catching const char*, the programmer's encouraged to use a more dynamic mechanism to concatenate desired information:

  • a std::string and +
  • a std::ostringstream
  • a char buffer and perhaps strcat and/or sprintf()

The most obvious ways of using these don't work or don't work well:

// temporaries...
throw (std::string("couldn't parse input: ") + input).c_str();
throw (std::ostringstream() << "error line " << __LINE__).str().c_str();
char buf[1024]; sprintf(buf, "error line %ld%", __LINE); throw buf;

// not thread-safe
static char buf...

Even if the programmer knows not to do any of these, they'll still have a right time finding all the client code that needs to start accepting a richer value type, especially if other throw/catch usage of const char* persists.

So, using a class that embeds a flexible std::string description by value is very important for writing maintainable code.

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Can't believe this answer only has four up-votes. –  Alastair Maw Oct 26 '12 at 16:20

No there is problem with throwing a char array. Just that you should receive as,

catch(const char* const errorMessage) {...}

1st const is to add ability to receive any char array char* const char* char[] const char[]

2nd const is to specify that errorMessage is not intended to change within catch block

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2  
second const is to intend that, errorMessage is not supposed to change. –  iammilind Jun 6 '11 at 6:24
1  
@James A constant pointer to constant characters. –  Maxpm Jun 6 '11 at 6:24
2  
It is perfectly legal, but not a best practice. See Charles's answer. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jun 6 '11 at 6:27
1  
@Gene: how's that relevant? (these aren't function parameters) –  Tony D Jun 6 '11 at 8:02
1  
@Tony The mechanism is very much like that used for function parameters. It's pass by copy. –  James Kanze Jun 6 '11 at 8:32

There is the general issue of not being able to easily filter your exceptions and act on them based on type. However, i don't know if there is a C++ specific reason not to do it

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std::exception (or at least, std::runtime_error) contains a string, that can be accessed through the what() method. Best thing you can do is to use that, since it's standard, and other code can expect it, and since it serves your purpose anyway.

Better stick to the standard in this case.

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If your idea of throwing a string as an error was for convenience of showing the error to the user, consider that this would make localizing your application more difficult (may or may not be a concern to you though).

Also if another part of the application needs to understand what the error is so it can react to it (eg if it is a disconnect error, try to reconnect automatically, but if it's a password error, just show error message to the user), it is better to have some sort of error code available to the exception catcher.

In our app, our exceptions are derived from std::exception. They contain an error type (an enum), a debug error message (including file/line number), and a localized error string.

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I think this is much more simpler. :).

#include <iostream>
#include <exception>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    try {
        throw runtime_error("This is an Error"); 
    }catch (exception& e){
        cout << "Exception: " << e.what() << endl; 
    }
    return 0; 
}
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