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I am new to sql, and I try to do manipulation on data with inline /in-code sql commands. However, I know that u need to write a lot of code sometimes in trans-sql.. When i write it,, then people say it is subject to sql injections. Then I dont know what to do...

What would be easier for me to do taking into account that i am not an expert on databases programming. Should i use Stored procedures or inline text. And how do i pass parameters to stored procedures? (e.g if i have an input from a textbox).

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3  
Buying a book on SQL and reading it and practicing the examples would take you maybe a week or less - it is probably well worth the time. – womp Jun 6 '11 at 6:25
    
Thats what i did. But i am thinking of doing the whole thing in stored procedures. I dont know how to pass parameters to stored procedures – WithFlyingColors Jun 6 '11 at 6:45
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let's take an example to Login a user:

the normal query would be something like

SELECT name, lastLogin 
FROM [tblUsers] 
where username = 'balexandre' AND password = 'veryhard';

when putting this into code, it would be kind'a

using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString)) { 

    DataSet userDataset = new DataSet(); 

    string query = "SELECT name, lastLogin FROM [tblUsers] where username = '" + txtUser.Text.Trim() + "' AND password = '" + txtPassword.Text.Trim() + "'";

    SqlDataAdapter myCommand = new SqlDataAdapter(query, connection);
    myCommand.Fill(userDataset); 
}

But this will not prevent SQL Injection, as, try to imagine what happen if I add in the username textbox something like % and in the password textbox something like ' OR 1=1-- or just ' OR 1=1-- in the username textbox. This would be valid as: 1 is a matter of fact equal to 1 and I would be logged in...

the passed Query would be like:

SELECT name, lastLogin 
FROM [tblUsers] 
where username = '' OR 1=1 --' AND password = '';

You get it, right?

But if we use parameters in our query, this will never happen, like this:

using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString)) { 

    DataSet userDataset = new DataSet(); 

    string query = "SELECT name, lastLogin FROM [tblUsers] where username = @username AND password = @password";
    SqlDataAdapter myCommand = new SqlDataAdapter(query, connection);

    myCommand.SelectCommand.Parameters.Add("@username", SqlDbType.VarChar, 30); 
    myCommand.SelectCommand.Parameters["@username"].Value = txtUser.Text.Trim(); 

    myCommand.SelectCommand.Parameters.Add("@password", SqlDbType.VarChar, 30); 
    myCommand.SelectCommand.Parameters["@password"].Value = txtPassword.Text.Trim(); 

    myCommand.Fill(userDataset); 
}

Samething if you want to use Store Procedures:

using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString)) { 

    DataSet userDataset = new DataSet(); 

    string query = "spGetUser";
    SqlDataAdapter myCommand = new SqlDataAdapter(query, connection);
    myCommand.SelectCommand.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure; 

    myCommand.SelectCommand.Parameters.Add("@username", SqlDbType.VarChar, 30); 
    myCommand.SelectCommand.Parameters["@username"].Value = txtUser.Text.Trim(); 

    myCommand.SelectCommand.Parameters.Add("@password", SqlDbType.VarChar, 30); 
    myCommand.SelectCommand.Parameters["@password"].Value = txtPassword.Text.Trim(); 

    myCommand.Fill(userDataset); 
}

Nowdays, you can avoid to think in all of this if you work and use something like a Database ORM (Object-relational mapping) that, instead of righting all the SQL stuff and worry about this, the Framework will take care of all known actions for you.

One of the most used Databases ORM is NHibernate and ADO Entity Framework.

You can use LINQ queries with this and your call would be like:

public User GetUser(string username, string password)
{
    return _db.Users.FirstOrDefault(x => x.User == username && x.Password == password);
}

and if you had a Store Procedure, it's the same (the example below just shows another way to call it)

public User GetUser(string username, string password)
{
    return (from u in _db.spGetUser(username, password)
            select u).FirstOrDefault();                
}

And you don't need to think about, caching, injection, concurrency, etc ...

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ORM, is too slow. Thanks for the answer. I think i will stick to stored procedures as they are neater – WithFlyingColors Jun 6 '11 at 7:09
    
it's quite fast if you know how to use it :) – balexandre Jun 6 '11 at 9:01

Stored procedure is not a mandatory option to write sql injection safe code. you can use parametrized query that can tackle sql injection attack.

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You don't have to use stored procedures to avoid 'SQL Injection; you just have to use parametrised queries (which stored procedures obviously are).

The C# Station ADO.NET Tutorial

Using Parameters with a SqlCommand and a Stored Procedure

Bare bones example (haven't compiled):

string connectionString = "Server=(local);DataBase=Northwind;Integrated Security=SSPI";

using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
     conn.Open(); 
     SqlCommand cmd  = new SqlCommand("MyStoredProcName_CustOrderHist", conn);
     cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

     cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@CustomerID", custId));

     // execute the command
     SqlDataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader();

     while (rdr.Read())
     {
          // do something with results
     }


     conn.close;
}
share|improve this answer
    
ooh, okay. i do prefer to use stored procedures. because if i have a lot of code, there will be a lot of mess. Is there a place or a book where can read onhow to construct and apply stored procedures with vs2010? – WithFlyingColors Jun 6 '11 at 6:43

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